POLITICS IS THE REAL DEAL FOR ME, SAYS ACTRESS

AWARD winning actresscum-politician Tatenda Mavetera, 32
says while the world of acting is more of fantasy; she has since discovered
that politics is the real deal for her.

Mavetera, who rose to prominence as an actress playing the
role of Tendai …

AWARD winning actresscum-politician Tatenda Mavetera, 32 says while the world of acting is more of fantasy; she has since discovered that politics is the real deal for her. Mavetera, who rose to prominence as an actress playing the role of Tendai Jari in the popular television soapie Studio 263, left the screen for Parliament after she was appointed for the Seke-Chikomba parliamentary seat (

MENTALLY ILL PATIENTS ESCAPE FROM PARI

TWO mentally challenged patients escaped from
Parirenyatwa Annex Psychiatric Unit during visiting hours at the weekend, causing commotion in
the Avenues area of Harare as well as the central business district. 

Onlookers reported that the two were…

TWO mentally challenged patients escaped from Parirenyatwa Annex Psychiatric Unit during visiting hours at the weekend, causing commotion in the Avenues area of Harare as well as the central business district.  Onlookers reported that the two were terrorising pedestrians with one of the patients controlling traffic at corner Chinamano Avenue and Third Street as the Annex officials launched a

Climate change linked to viral outbreaks like Covid – 19

Source: Climate change linked to viral outbreaks like Covid – 19 | The Herald It is crucial for humanity to address as a matter of urgency the multiple threats from cross-cutting issues such as climate change, deforestation and biodiversity loss Jeffrey Gogo Climate Story Several months before the coronavirus (Covid – 19) outbreak in China last […]

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Source: Climate change linked to viral outbreaks like Covid – 19 | The Herald

Climate change linked to viral outbreaks like Covid – 19
It is crucial for humanity to address as a matter of urgency the multiple threats from cross-cutting issues such as climate change, deforestation and biodiversity loss

Jeffrey Gogo Climate Story

Several months before the coronavirus (Covid – 19) outbreak in China last November, scientists at Auburn University published research that hypothesised the relationship between biodiversity loss (and by extension climate change) and the global emergency of infectious diseases.

In the study titled, ‘The Coevolution Effect as a Driver of Spillover’, the researchers found “that as humans alter the landscape through habitat loss, forest fragments act as islands, and the wildlife hosts disease-causing microbes that live within them undergo rapid diversification.”

They observed that “across a fragmented landscape we would then see an increase in diversity of disease-causing microbes, increasing the probability that any one of these microbes may spill over into human populations, leading to outbreaks.”

The coevolution effect, as developed by the Auburn University scientists, is premised on “ecology and evolutionary biology, to explain the underlying mechanisms that drive this association.”

Worldwide, scientists are agreed that infectious diseases such as SARS, Ebola, Zika, West Nike virus and others are zoonotic — meaning they spread from animals to humans.

In the same context, the novel pneumonia Covid-19, which has killed about 8 000 people throughout the world, has its origins in wildlife, mainly the eating of bats by humans, even though the Malayan pangolin, illegally imported into China’s Guangdong province, contains coronaviruses similar to Covid-19. That’s the first assumption.

The second is that a progenitor of Covid -19 jumped into humans, acquiring certain features through adaptation during undetected human-to-human transmission.

Once acquired, say researchers, these adaptations enabled “the pandemic to take off and produce a sufficiently large cluster of cases to trigger the surveillance system that detected it.”

But there’s something noteworthy that these findings put to rest — the countless conspiracy theories around the origins of Covid-19, which started in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, infecting hundreds of thousands of people around the world and forcing the global economy into a tailspin.

Scientists conclude that the virus “is not a laboratory construct or a purposefully manipulated virus,” according to a research note by a group of researchers in the scientific journal Nature Medicine, published March 17.

An even more interesting aspect is how deadly viral outbreaks such as Covid-19 could be influenced, now and in the future, by climate change and other factors such as destruction of environmental habitats, —industrial agriculture and rapid urbanisation.

Harare-based climate expert professor Kenneth Odero told The Herald Finance & Business that the outbreak of infectious viruses and other pathogens have been associated with disruptions to habitats and climates caused by human activity in farming, transportation, mining and others.

“Human activities, broadly speaking, are (cumulatively) the drivers of anthropogenic climate change,” Prof Odero explained.

“The latter invariably puts pressure on wild animals and birds, whose survival and adaptation instinct often leads to migration. The outbreak of diseases in both animals and humans has been linked to such migration,” he added.

In disease ecology, the dilution effect hypothesis is heavily relied upon.

Released early in the 21st century, the hypothesis is built around the idea that “biodiversity conservation can protect humans from emerging infectious diseases.”

The Nature Medicine scientist said “the dilution effect highlights the critical role that wildlife conservation can play in protecting human health and has transformed the understanding of zoonotic infectious diseases.”

Indeed, it is crucial for humanity to address as a matter of urgency the multiple threats from cross-cutting issues such as climate change, deforestation and biodiversity loss.

“Humans and nature are of one connected system, and nature provides the food, medicine, water, clean air and many other benefits that have allowed people to thrive,” said Doreen Robinson, chief of wildlife at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), in article on the agency’s website.

“Yet like all systems, we need to understand how it works so that we don’t push things too far and face increasingly negative consequences.”

According to UNEP’s Frontiers 2016 Report on Emerging Issues of Environment Concern, diseases transmitted from wildlife to humans threaten the entire fabric of social and economic development as well as ecosystem integrity.

In the last 20 years, says the report, emerging diseases have had direct costs of more than US$100 billion, “with that figure jumping to several trillion dollars if the outbreaks had become human pandemics.”

God is faithful.

jeffgogo@gmail.com

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Caledonia to increase Blanket Mine stake

Source: Caledonia to increase Blanket Mine stake | Herald (Business) Blanket Mine Michael Tome Business Reporter CALEDONIA Mining Corporation says it is targeting to acquire 15 percent shareholding in Blanket Mine, a development that will see the mining group having controlling stake of 64 percent in the mine. The company also revealed an improved outlook […]

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Source: Caledonia to increase Blanket Mine stake | Herald (Business)

Blanket Mine

Michael Tome Business Reporter

CALEDONIA Mining Corporation says it is targeting to acquire 15 percent shareholding in Blanket Mine, a development that will see the mining group having controlling stake of 64 percent in the mine.

The company also revealed an improved outlook and proposed an increase in quarterly dividend payments by 9 percent to 7,5 cents per share.

The mining firm has been on a positive trajectory having recorded 55,182 ounces of gold in the year to 31 December 2019, which is about 671 ounces better than 54,511 ounces realised the previous year.

To maintain this solid performance, Caledonia says it aims to grow its capacity from the pending commissioning of its central shaft towards the end of 2020 financial year.

Just before the end of 2019, the mining concern announced its successful commissioning of an oxygen plant at the aforementioned mine, marking a series of capital expenditure projects that are aimed at growing production at the same time improving operating proficiency.

Caledonia Mining Corporation, which is Toronto Stock Exchange-listed, indicated its intention to invest in a solar farm in an effort to deal with the crippling power cuts that were experienced in the country for the better part of last year.

Resultantly, US$4,2 million increase in working capital was recorded.

This was attributed to growth in inventories, part of which relates to increased stocks of diesel to protect against electricity interruptions from the grid.

The mining concern, however, indicated that all the aforementioned enhancements are aimed at growing gold output to 80 000 ounces per annum by 2022.

In a statement accompanying the full year results, Caledonia Mining Corporation chief executive Steve Curtis said; “. . . the firm aims to complete the purchase of an additional 15 percent shareholding in Blanket increasing Caledonia’s shareholding to 64 percent.”

He added; “Central shaft commissioning is expected in the last quarter of 2020 after which production can begin to ramp up: target production in 2021 is approximately 75 000 ounces and approximately 80 000 ounces in 2022.”

In the period under review, Caledonia reported revenue of US$75,8 million, up from US$68,4 million, as operations at the Blanket Mine marked new production records for the year.

In an interview with Proactive a United Kingdom based media house Mr Curtis said; “I am delighted by Blanket Mine’s strong performance, which resulted in a record level of production in the fourth quarter.”

“Increased production, combined with lower on-mine costs per ounce and an improved gold price, resulted in a substantial increase in profit.”

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Tongues wag as villagers witness two snakes having se_x: It was not an easy job to separate the two

Residents of Justicia B Village near Bushbuckridge in Mpumalanga were on Saturday left shocked after they witnessed two snakes poking. According to residents, the female was facing down while the male was on top.It took the rescue team almost two hours…

Residents of Justicia B Village near Bushbuckridge in Mpumalanga were on Saturday left shocked after they witnessed two snakes poking. According to residents, the female was facing down while the male was on top.It took the rescue team almost two hours to separate the two snakes that were so tied to each other. Some suspected […]