TEXTBOOKS DUTY SCRAPPED

Finance and Economic Development Minister Patrick Chinamasa has ordered the Zimbabwe Revenue Authority (Zimra) to scrap a 40 percent levy on imported textbooks.



In a letter to Higher and Tertiary Education, Science and Technology Development Minister Professor Jonathan Moyo seen by The Herald, Minister Chinamasa said he would instruct Zimra to scrap the levy on imported textbooks in retrospect. The regulations on import duties are expected to be gazetted this week.
“Honourable Minister, you will recall that in my Mid-Term Policy Review Statement, I indicated that capacity utilisation in the printing and publishing industry has declined mainly due to an influx of imported printed products, lack of access to affordable funding and obsolete equipment, among others,” said Minister Chinamasa in the letter.

“The intention, however, was clearly not to levy duty on textbooks, especially since the local industry does not have capacity to produce,” he said.

“I am through copy of this minute advising Zimra to accordingly effect the necessary amendment in retrospect.”

Recently, Professor Moyo reaffirmed his ministry’s commitment to keep the price of education low, citing his recent appeal to Minister Chinamasa to scrap the 40 percent import duty on textbooks.

“We engaged the Ministry of Finance over the matter of 40 percent import duty per textbook and $1 per page. It’s not their intention to impose duty and they have promised to address the issue soon. We expect the gazetting of the changes soon,” he added.

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TEXTBOOKS DUTY SCRAPPED

Finance and Economic Development Minister Patrick Chinamasa has ordered the Zimbabwe Revenue Authority (Zimra) to scrap a 40 percent levy on imported textbooks.



In a letter to Higher and Tertiary Education, Science and Technology Development Minister Professor Jonathan Moyo seen by The Herald, Minister Chinamasa said he would instruct Zimra to scrap the levy on imported textbooks in retrospect. The regulations on import duties are expected to be gazetted this week.
“Honourable Minister, you will recall that in my Mid-Term Policy Review Statement, I indicated that capacity utilisation in the printing and publishing industry has declined mainly due to an influx of imported printed products, lack of access to affordable funding and obsolete equipment, among others,” said Minister Chinamasa in the letter.

“The intention, however, was clearly not to levy duty on textbooks, especially since the local industry does not have capacity to produce,” he said.

“I am through copy of this minute advising Zimra to accordingly effect the necessary amendment in retrospect.”

Recently, Professor Moyo reaffirmed his ministry’s commitment to keep the price of education low, citing his recent appeal to Minister Chinamasa to scrap the 40 percent import duty on textbooks.

“We engaged the Ministry of Finance over the matter of 40 percent import duty per textbook and $1 per page. It’s not their intention to impose duty and they have promised to address the issue soon. We expect the gazetting of the changes soon,” he added.

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Your email address will not be published.