YET MORE BENEFITS FOR WAR VETS

THE cash-strapped government is on the verge of paying gratuities to families of tens of thousands of people who died fighting in the war of liberation that ended nearly four decades ago in a development that is certain to put further strain on the fiscus.

War Veterans Minister, Christopher Mutsvangwa, told Parliament last week that his ministry was in the process of compiling a comprehensive database of all people who participated in the war of liberation with the view of paying gratuities and other benefits to the families of those who died during the war as well as those passed on before they could be handsomely rewarded in 1997.

 “We would like them to be eligible for the benefits which are entitled to them under the Constitution,” Mutsvangwa told the House of Assembly on September 23, in response to a question from Movement for Democratic Change (MDC-T) legislator for Binga, Joel Gabbuza — a war veteran himself — on what the government was doing to address injustices inherent in the benefit scheme for former liberation war fighters.

 “This is now much more an issue of resources and administration. I do not want to pre-empt my brief to Cabinet as well as to the other members of government, but what we are working on is a relationship even with the donor community which has now since decided to become very friendly to the war veterans.”

Added Mutsvangwa: “We are of the feeling that the definition by the Constitution of a war veteran is catering for even those who may not have survived during the war. The issue which then arises is to the modalities at which we can identify those who took part in the war, sacrificed heroically but did not make it home.”

 Ballpark figures suggest that about 10 000 freedom fighters died on the battlefield, but the overall figure of those who perished during the liberation struggle is estimated at more than 50 000 as tens of thousands of Zimbabweans were killed in raids by Ian Smith’s Rhodesian Forces on camps like Chimoio, Nyadzonia, Tembwe in Mozambique as well as at Freedom Camp, Mkushi, Mulungushi, Kavalamanja and others in Zambia, while villagers who supported the war effort were also killed. financial gazette

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YET MORE BENEFITS FOR WAR VETS

THE cash-strapped government is on the verge of paying gratuities to families of tens of thousands of people who died fighting in the war of liberation that ended nearly four decades ago in a development that is certain to put further strain on the fiscus.

War Veterans Minister, Christopher Mutsvangwa, told Parliament last week that his ministry was in the process of compiling a comprehensive database of all people who participated in the war of liberation with the view of paying gratuities and other benefits to the families of those who died during the war as well as those passed on before they could be handsomely rewarded in 1997.

 “We would like them to be eligible for the benefits which are entitled to them under the Constitution,” Mutsvangwa told the House of Assembly on September 23, in response to a question from Movement for Democratic Change (MDC-T) legislator for Binga, Joel Gabbuza — a war veteran himself — on what the government was doing to address injustices inherent in the benefit scheme for former liberation war fighters.

 “This is now much more an issue of resources and administration. I do not want to pre-empt my brief to Cabinet as well as to the other members of government, but what we are working on is a relationship even with the donor community which has now since decided to become very friendly to the war veterans.”

Added Mutsvangwa: “We are of the feeling that the definition by the Constitution of a war veteran is catering for even those who may not have survived during the war. The issue which then arises is to the modalities at which we can identify those who took part in the war, sacrificed heroically but did not make it home.”

 Ballpark figures suggest that about 10 000 freedom fighters died on the battlefield, but the overall figure of those who perished during the liberation struggle is estimated at more than 50 000 as tens of thousands of Zimbabweans were killed in raids by Ian Smith’s Rhodesian Forces on camps like Chimoio, Nyadzonia, Tembwe in Mozambique as well as at Freedom Camp, Mkushi, Mulungushi, Kavalamanja and others in Zambia, while villagers who supported the war effort were also killed. financial gazette

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Your email address will not be published.