YEAR 2020: President Emmerson Dambudzo Mnangagwa’s message to Zimbabweans

The country’s focus in 2020 should be on increased productivity, economic growth and job creation for the betterment of people’s livelihoods, President Mnangagwa has said. In his New Year message delivered at State House yesterday, the Pres…

The country’s focus in 2020 should be on increased productivity, economic growth and job creation for the betterment of people’s livelihoods, President Mnangagwa has said. In his New Year message delivered at State House yesterday, the President said the country experienced several challenges such as destruction and deaths brought by Cyclone Idai and drought, but […]

Drama as Dancehall star Winky D launches his new album Njema wearing prison jersey

Dancehall star Winky D yesterday launched his album Njema and he was wearing a signature red and white jersey (same as the ZPCS’s prison jersey) which left one popular journalist asking if Winky D had gone all in, in painting the picture that Zim…

Dancehall star Winky D yesterday launched his album Njema and he was wearing a signature red and white jersey (same as the ZPCS’s prison jersey) which left one popular journalist asking if Winky D had gone all in, in painting the picture that Zimbabwe is now a prison due to the economic crisis. Hopewell Chi’ono […]

LATEST: Jonathan Moyo reveals why President Mnangagwa failed to take annual leave

SELF-EXILED former Zanu-PF propagandist Professor Jonathan Moyo has claimed that a coup was attempted on President Emmerson Mnangagwa in early November, but it was foiled. Moyo says it was because of fear of another coup that the President has not chos…

SELF-EXILED former Zanu-PF propagandist Professor Jonathan Moyo has claimed that a coup was attempted on President Emmerson Mnangagwa in early November, but it was foiled. Moyo says it was because of fear of another coup that the President has not chosen to go on an annual leave outside the country. The President has been at […]

Zimbabwe’s youths shun festivities to focus on survival

Source: Zimbabwe’s youths shun festivities to focus on survival – Anadolu Agency Zimbabweans have lost sight of Christmas and New Year’s festivities amid a teetering economy HARARE, Zimbabwe  Christmas and New Year’s no longer matter to 29-year-old Raymond Mutavara, a jobless Zimbabwean university graduate, because he has more pressing things on his mind. “For the […]

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Source: Zimbabwe’s youths shun festivities to focus on survival – Anadolu Agency

Zimbabweans have lost sight of Christmas and New Year’s festivities amid a teetering economy

Zimbabwe’s youths shun festivities to focus on survival

HARARE, Zimbabwe 

Christmas and New Year’s no longer matter to 29-year-old Raymond Mutavara, a jobless Zimbabwean university graduate, because he has more pressing things on his mind.

“For the past six years, I have grappled with economic challenges, living on my own. My parents live in a rural area, and I have to make sure I send something for them there, and therefore, even if it’s Christmas or New Year’s, I have to sell my things to make money,” Mutavara told Anadolu Agency.

He said he graduated with a national certificate in marketing from Harare Polytechnic College six years ago.

But like millions of other graduates, Mutavara has never been lucky enough to land a job, and for him, celebrating Christmas or New Year’s is “worthless” because he has no means to do that.

According to the Zimbabwe Congress of Trade Unions (ZCTU), the country’s biggest trade union organization, more than 90% of the country’s approximately 14 million people are unemployed.

Another thorn in the side of many Zimbabwean youths like Mutavara is inflation, which is hovering above 300% according to statistics from the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

But even as this hurts Zimbabweans — particularly youths like Mutavara, who have to bear the brunt of joblessness — Christmas and New Year’s festivities have over the years been joyous events here. But not anymore.

Across the globe, in countries where Christianity holds sway, millions if not billions of Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ every year on Dec. 25.

Then on Jan. 1, the world, including Zimbabwe, celebrates the beginning of a new year.

Christmas and New Year’s are commemorated with drinking, feasting, dancing and reunions with friends and relatives in countries like Zimbabwe. But for many like Mutavara, that is no longer the case.

“I have no money to do that. I have no time for that because I have to be busy looking for money to meet my basic needs. I have to pay my monthly rent where I stay, and if I waste the little earnings that I get every day on those two days of feasting, where will I go without paying rent?” he said.

Unidentified male vendor sits by a street corner at Jason Moyo Avenue, Harare street in the Zimbabwean capital selling popcorn and sweets placed on his makeshift market stall. (Jeffrey Moyo/ Anadolu Agency)

Mutavara said he also has to be up and about in his search for money to feed himself besides those depending on him, although he is not yet married.

During this year’s Christmas celebrations, for instance, in the capital Harare’s central business district, youths lined up their wares along popular First Street, touting for customers who apparently proved hard to get.

“It’s business as usual. If you sleep, saying it’s Christmas, nobody will give you money tomorrow,” 31-year old Linda Munemo, a vendor who sold baby clothes spread on a mat on the ground at the Copacabana bus station in the capital, told Anadolu Agency.

Starvation also taunts Zimbabwe from left, right and center, not sparing rural or urban areas.

This means youths like Mutavara and Munemo are no exception in the face of famine as well, a situation many like them say has forced them to lose sight of Christmas and New Year’s.

This year, the UN World Food Program (WFP) estimated that around 5.5 million Zimbabweans in both rural and urban areas would require food aid amid a debilitating drought that has hit the nation.

Shops and supermarkets have turned into no-go areas for poor Zimbabweans because of the biting cost of living. For instance, just 10 kilograms of mealie-meal costs over 100 Zimbabwean dollars, or approximately US$6.

Mealie-meal is made from ground maize, sorghum or millet in Zimbabwe and is used to prepare sadza, a thick porridge — the country’s staple food.

Amid Zimbabwe’s fading Christmas and New Year’s euphoria, civil society leaders like Claris Madhuku have equally seen nothing worth celebrating.

“Young people are correct — they can’t celebrate Christmas or New Year’s these days because most of them are poor and living from hand to mouth,” Madhuku, who heads a civil society organization called the Platform for Youth Development, told Anadolu Agency.

Yet as poverty reigns supreme in Zimbabwe, robbing many like Mutavara and Munemo’s joy during festivities like Christmas and New Year’s, for independent economists like Marshall Hove, who has an economics degree from the University of Zimbabwe, even worse days may be ahead as long as Zimbabwe does not address the economic fundamentals of its own economy.

To trade union activists like Zivaishe Zhou, at this rate of economic decay, very soon, people will completely stop celebrating anything.

 

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Parly’s question and answer sessions should be more effective

Source: Parly’s question and answer sessions should be more effective | Newsday (News) BY VENERANDA LANGA Question and answer sessions have been some of the major highlights of Parliament as they are usually robust, expose MPs lack of research, and mostly expose ministers’ ignorance of policy issues under their purview and their bunking of the […]

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Source: Parly’s question and answer sessions should be more effective | Newsday (News)

BY VENERANDA LANGA
Question and answer sessions have been some of the major highlights of Parliament as they are usually robust, expose MPs lack of research, and mostly expose ministers’ ignorance of policy issues under their purview and their bunking of the sessions.

In Zimbabwe, these are done on Wednesday in the National Assembly and Thursday in the Senate.

Since these are broadcast live on national television, MPs and Senators that are usually mum during debates of Bills and motions take part in question and answer sessions.
However, most of the questions asked by MPs are usually pertinent and touch on issues that affect Zimbabweans.

Bunking of question and answer sessions by ministers

In 2019, ministers were perennially absent to take questions from backbenchers in the National Assembly and Senate. Innocent Gonese (Mutare Central MP) and MDC chief whip Prosper Mutseyami constantly raised the issues with Speaker of Parliament Jacob Mudenda of absence of ministers during Wednesday’s question and answer sessions.

The Speaker was never defensive of the truancy by ministers in Parliament despite him being a member of the ruling Zanu PF party.

In September, Mudenda wrote to President Emmerson Mnangagwa twice, advising him of the truancy of his ministers during question and answer sessions in Parliament.

This was after a handful of ministers had availed themselves in Senate and the National Assembly to take questions from MPs. On average, around 10 ministers and deputy ministers avail themselves for question and answer sessions. As a result, most questions that are specific to their ministries end up being responded to by the leader of government business in Parliament, Ziyambi Ziyambi.

The effect has been that although Ziyambi is well versed with different government policies, he might not specifically know everything. For example, if an MP wants to know if stophavine and donus are good anti-retroviral treatment drugs, Ziyambi as a legal person might not be able to give a satisfactory response to that issue which needs a health expert to do so.

Mudenda even described the absence of ministers as appalling and pathetic, adding that it was high time that truant ministers were charged with contempt of Parliament.

Section 139 (d) of the Constitution allows for the questioning of ministers and deputy ministers by MPs in Senate and the National Assembly, while section 107 (2) of the Constitution also compels every Vice-President, minister and deputy ministers to attend Parliamentary committees and the House to answer questions from MPs.

Despite the Speaker’s letter to the President in September, ministers continued to bunk the sessions and no minister has ever been charged with contempt of Parliament for truancy.
This is despite that when ministers were appointed soon after the removal of the late former President Robert Mugabe, they promised to hit the ground running and to be different from the old era of ministers who were also known for truancy.

Every Wednesday, Mudenda reads a list of ministers who would have given apologies and cannot attend question and answer sessions due to foreign travel or other commitments.

Senate president Mabel Chinomona and her deputy Michael Nyambuya have also expressed utmost dismay over truancy of ministers during Thursday’s question and answer sessions.

In September, Nyambuya said: “It is most regrettable and I can assure you that we are going to bring this to the attention of the President. We obviously have some ministers who are on duty elsewhere, but I am sure and convinced that there are other ministers somewhere out there who did not come for question and answer session.”

Every Thursday in Senate, Chinomona and her deputy Nyambuya have to announce the names of the ministers present as if it is a big favour that they are present.

Ziyambi under pressure to respond to policy questions on behalf of bunking ministers

Whenever ministers are not present, or have bunked Parliament question and answer sessions Ziyambi as leader of the House, is then asked to respond on behalf of those absent ministers. But the problem is that Ziyambi cannot be expected to know everything.

For example, on January 30, 2019, Gwanda North MP Madodana Sibanda (Zanu PF) had a question directed to the Lands and Agriculture minister Perrance Shiri or his two deputies Douglas Karoro and Vangelis Haritatos, but they were absent. They were not also announced on the Speakers’ list of ministers that had tendered their apologies to be excused from question and answer session.

Sibanda had to refer the question to Ziyambi: “What is government policy regarding the use of third tier farms – farms that are meant for grazing only because some of the farms are being subdivided into plots?”

Ziyambi, as Justice minister, could not answer the policy question which needed specifically any of the three agriculture ministers.

His response was: “I request the MP to put the question in writing because it is a specific question.”

On the same date, Norton MP Temba Mliswa asked a mining question to Ziyambi.

“Is the leader of government business aware that there is a ruling of the Supreme Court which bars Zimbabwe Consolidated Diamond Company (ZCDC) from mining in Marange? There are also recommendations from the Portfolio Committee of Mines which recommended that ZCDC is an illegal entity and that the concessions must go to the former owners. Is the President aware of this before his approval of the diamond policy?”

The Mines minister Winston Chitando and his deputy Polite Kambamura were not present and Ziyambi was forced to respond.

“I will bring it to the attention of the minister so that he can come back to the House with a more informed answer which speaks to the judgment of the Supreme Court,” Ziyambi responded.

These two examples show that it is important for ministers to avail themselves for question and answer sessions so that they respond to policy questions pertaining to their ministries.

Written questions with notice

It is disappointing that due to truancy of ministers at question and answer sessions, most written answers to questions, which are actually questions asked in advance and printed on the Parliament Order Papers have been deferred – most of them have clocked several months without being responded to.

For example, Parliament National Assembly votes for September 4 2019, show written questions with notice that were deferred from June and July, which means that the responsible ministers had not responded to the questions from MPs for three months.

For instance, Chitungwiza North MP Godfrey Sithole (MDC Alliance) asked a written question with notice to Local Government minister July Moyo on June 12 which was not responded to for three months and continued to appear on the National Assembly Order Paper in September.

The question had asked Moyo to give an update on the number of people on the housing waiting list for Chitungwiza Municipality.

Another example is a written question by Mhangura MP Precious Masango (Zanu PF) who wanted Shiri to apprise the House on measures being taken to curb the alleged corruption involved in the selling of maize at a Grain Marketing Board depot in Mhangura.

Masango’s question was asked on June 12, 2019 and by September 4, 2019 it still appeared on the National Assembly Order Paper because it was not answered.

These are just examples as there are several written questions pertaining to serious economic and political issues that have clocked months on the National Assembly and Senate Order Papers without being responded to by ministers. Every week, they would be deferred.

For some questions, the First Session of the Ninth Parliament came to an end without them being responded to by the responsible ministers despite that they were written questions with notice.

Significance of question and answer sessions

The United Kingdom House of Commons information office says parliamentary question and answer sessions are significant as they allow MPs to hold members of the Executive to account.
“They allow Members of Parliament to hold the government to account, using either oral questions to ministers in the Chamber of the House of Commons or written questions,” they said.

Written questions are made in advance and they appear on the Order Paper. These allow MPs to ask for information from ministers on their work, government policies and even the work of government departments. MPs can also ask about developmental issues pertaining to their constituencies, for example, an issue about lack of schools in their constituencies.

The Southern African Parliamentary Support Trust in its paper on questions and answers in Zimbabwe’s Parliament said the question without notice segment is confined to policy issues, where backbenchers quiz ministers on policies under their purview.

However, MPs are allowed to further probe if the minister does not give a satisfactory answer by asking supplementary questions related to the question.

Too many MPs in the National Assembly

The fact that the National Assembly has 270 legislators has made it very difficult for an MP to be chosen by the Speaker and be given a chance to pose a question without notice. However, a better plan was devised whereby political party chief whips write down names of their MPs who will ask questions.

However, some MPs who are very vocal and hardworking have always taken every chance to be noticed by the Speaker through asking supplementary questions.

In Senate, those Senators that have never asked any questions are probably very lazy because they have no problems of numbers.

Quality of questions asked during question and answer sessions

While MPs are given induction training as soon as they are sworn in, some have been very slow in mastering Parliament procedures, and the do’s and don’ts of question time.
For instance, on several instances, Mudenda has embarrassed different MPs for asking a question which has been asked and responded to before.

Some of the most common repetitions by legislators are questions on partisan food aid, agricultural inputs, and others which Mudenda has often had to remind MPs that the question was asked the previous week. This exposes that some MPs do not read, research, or they ask questions so that they can just be recorded as having said something in Parliament by the Hansard.

Senators also have the habit of asking ministers on Thursdays, the same questions that would have been asked by MPs in the National Assembly on Wednesdays.

MPs have managed to raise good questions on the economic quagmire, human rights issues, cash shortages, constitutional issues, access to sanitary wear for girls and several other important issues.

For example, on January 30 soon after people were shot during the fuel protests, and this was followed by gross human rights abuses, Ziyambi was asked very challenging questions both in Senate and National Assembly on the human rights situation in the country.

Quality of responses during question and answer sessions

Some questions raised by MPs in Parliament also expose ministers’ ignorance and lack of knowledge of their ministry policies.

On several occasions, Ziyambi has rushed to the rescue of ministers and their deputies who show lack of understanding of their portfolios or government policies.

Vice-Presidents’ failure to attend question and answer sessions

Section 107 (2) of the Constitution reads: “Every VP, minister and deputy minister must attend Parliament and Parliamentary committees in order to answer questions concerning matters for which he or she is collectively or individually responsible.”

Vice-Presidents Constantino Chiwenga and Kembo Mohadi never attend question and answer sessions. During the Government of National Unity the late former Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai and his two former deputies Arthur Mutambara and Thokozani Khupe used to attend question and answer sessions in Parliament and took questions from MPs.

Gonese raised the issue of non-attendance of the two VPs at question and answer sessions.

“Ever since we started the Ninth Parliament I do not recall a day when any of the two VPs attended question and answer sessions and I am not sure whether they are aware of section 107 (2) of the Constitution to attend Parliament and answer questions. Can you also make a follow up on the VPs,” Gonese said.

Mudenda responded: “I have not received any explanations, but I have asked the Clerk of Parliament Kennedy Chokuda to phone the chief secretary to Cabinet Misheck Sibanda to ask where the ministers are.

“Let me also advice the House that this has been the worst non-attendance by ministers and whatever answers we get from Chokuda, I will make sure this gets to the attention of the President,” Mudenda said.

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Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Warns of Worsening Hunger Crisis in Zimbabwe – Zimbabwe

Source: Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Warns of Worsening Hunger Crisis in Zimbabwe – Zimbabwe | ReliefWeb In Zimbabwe, recurrent droughts, coupled with rising inflation, threaten nearly half the population’s ability to put food on the table HARARE  – Nearly seven million people across Zimbabwe are at risk of going hungry as a result of successive […]

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Source: Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Warns of Worsening Hunger Crisis in Zimbabwe – Zimbabwe | ReliefWeb

In Zimbabwe, recurrent droughts, coupled with rising inflation, threaten nearly half the population’s ability to put food on the table

HARARE  – Nearly seven million people across Zimbabwe are at risk of going hungry as a result of successive droughts and rising inflation. According to the Famine Early Warning Systems Network, Zimbabwe is at a “Phase 3” food crisis, meaning that acute malnutrition is widespread.

“Families have run out of options to put food on their tables,” said Dorrett Byrd, Catholic Relief Services’ (CRS) regional director for Southern Africa. “There have been extensive crop failures and we’re seeing families who have depleted their food supplies. At the same time, families’ savings have been wiped out because of inflation.”

Over the last five years, Zimbabwe has been plagued by recurrent droughts and dry spells. In a country where more than half the population survives on small-scale farming, that means that families have been forced to cope by using their savings or selling off household assets to buy food. According to figures from the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), approximately 7 million people in Zimbabwe are in urgent need of food assistance.

“To cope with what’s happening here, a growing number of young people are migrating from rural areas to urban areas to find jobs, or are leaving the country altogether,” Byrd said. “Migrating parents often leave their young children behind with grandparents who struggle to provide for them.”

What’s more, tens of thousands of families are still recovering from Cyclone Idai, which wreaked havoc on harvests. To make matters even worse, families are contending with severe inflation, making their economic situation even more precarious.

In addition to a variety of multi-sectoral assistance programs, CRS is training Zimbabwean farmers to use climate-smart farming techniques, such as improved soil and water conservation. CRS is also providing farmers with drought-resistant crops and livestock. In addition, CRS is working with the government to send text messages to farmers to warn them about potential risks to their crops.

The humanitarian situation in Zimbabwe is expected to further deteriorate in the months ahead, with projections for poor rainfall and harvests continuing into 2020.

Beyond the deteriorating conditions in Zimbabwe, CRS’ field experts are also warning of a worsening hunger crisis in Lesotho, Zambia, Mozambique, Madagascar and Malawi. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), more than 45 million people across Southern Africa are currently facing food insecurity.

“This area of the world needs help and it needs help now. The droughts have gotten longer and more intense because of climate change and these communities aren’t going to be able to address it without global assistance,” Byrd said. “There is an urgent need globally to take definitive action that will slow down, stop, or reverse climate change. We hope the economic situation improves soon, but if climate change is not addressed, countries like Zimbabwe will continue to suffer.”

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Feature: Zimbabweans have fresh hopes for New Year despite challenges 

Source: Feature: Zimbabweans have fresh hopes for New Year despite challenges – Xinhua | English.news.cn HARARE (Xinhua) — At a grocery supermarket in Arcadia, a middle-income suburb in Harare, 31-year-old Alyssa Botha is pushing a cart full of groceries towards her car. “The year 2019 has been a tough one,” she said. “We saw the […]

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Source: Feature: Zimbabweans have fresh hopes for New Year despite challenges – Xinhua | English.news.cn

HARARE (Xinhua) — At a grocery supermarket in Arcadia, a middle-income suburb in Harare, 31-year-old Alyssa Botha is pushing a cart full of groceries towards her car.

“The year 2019 has been a tough one,” she said. “We saw the price of basic commodities spiral. School fees and rentals skyrocketed. Power cuts were the order of the day and fuel became scarce. We have endured a lot, and as we enter 2020 I am hopeful that things will change for the better.”

“I can say the coming year will be better because most basic commodities are now available in shops,” she added.

Now with the New Year on the horizon, Botha said her main concern is how she is going to feed and dress her two sons given the volatile economic landscape in the country.

Vimbai Mutsena-Shumba from Chitungwiza, a dormitory town 30 kilometres south of Harare, said cash shortages were a major issue and hopes that the government will bring an end to this challenge.

“People are spending hours in queues at the bank to access cash, and I hope that in the coming year the responsible authorities will put an end to this problem,” she said.

With the scarcity of cash, Zimbabweans have over the past few years relied on mobile money for the settlement of most transactions.

While mobile money is gaining wider acceptance, in the informal sector most products have higher prices when using mobile money, which forces consumers to pay premiums of up to 50 per cent to get cash from mobile money agents.

“The major challenge that we will continue facing as business owners is the continuous declining demand of goods since income is being eroded by inflation. While the supply of basic commodities has remained stable, the spending power of the ordinary Zimbabwean has not,” said Langton Muwati, a grocery store owner in downtown Harare.

Muwati added that in the coming year the government should offer the productive sectors a stable operating environment by solving the power and fuel challenges currently facing the country.

Zimbabwe is currently experiencing daily power cuts lasting up to 18 hours after a severe drought reduced water levels at the country’s biggest hydro plant, the Kariba South Power Station.

In March this year, Sinohydro, a Chinese state-owned hydropower construction company, completed the Kariba South Hydro Power expansion project to boost power supplies in the country.

Although Kariba South was recently expanded to generate 300 additional megawatts, the station cannot generate enough power due to lower water levels in Lake Kariba.

Besides electricity cuts, Zimbabwe is also facing a huge fuel crisis which is attributed to the shortage of foreign currency which is needed to import fuel.

The fuel crisis also had a negative impact on the prices of commodities which have been going up whenever fuel prices are increased.

Zimbabwe’s official annual inflation rate was the second-highest in the world, at 176 per cent when the national statistics office suspended the release of data in August.

The Southern African country’s inflation reached historical levels of 500 billion per cent in 2008, rendering the local currency worthless and leaving savings and pensions useless.

The country then adopted a basket of currencies, among them the U.S. dollar, South African rand, Botswana pula and the British sterling pound in a bid to bring stability to the economy.

This year the government outlawed the use of foreign currencies, leaving the local currency, the RTGS dollar as the sole legal tender.

However, the local currency has been rapidly devaluing, resulting in many business owners pegging their products to the U.S. dollar.

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JUST IN: Mary Mubaiwa’s properties in SA located 

Source: JUST IN: Mary Mubaiwa’s properties in SA located | The Herald 31 DEC, 2019 Marry Mubaiwa at the Harare Magistrates Courts.— Picture: Justin Mutenda Nyore Madzianike Senior Court Reporter The State has managed to identify and position properties, including cars bought and owned by the estranged wife of Vice President Constantino Chiwenga, Marry Mubaiwa, […]

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Source: JUST IN: Mary Mubaiwa’s properties in SA located | The Herald 31 DEC, 2019

JUST IN: Mary Mubaiwa’s properties in SA located
Marry Mubaiwa at the Harare Magistrates Courts.— Picture: Justin Mutenda

Nyore Madzianike Senior Court Reporter
The State has managed to identify and position properties, including cars bought and owned by the estranged wife of Vice President Constantino Chiwenga, Marry Mubaiwa, in South Africa, the High Court heard.

This emerged today during Mubaiwa’s bail appeal in the matter in which she is facing foreign currency externalisation, money laundering and fraud charges.

The bail application was heard before Justice Pisirayi Kwenda.

Challenging a Harare magistrate Chrispen Mberewere’s decision to deny her bail, Mubaiwa through her lawyer Silvester Hashiti, said the State will have no problems in extraditing her from South Africa in the event that she crosses the border into South Africa, since her properties were already known and identified.

She also argued that she was not a flight risk, who could be detected by anyone in the event that she decides to leave the court’s jurisdiction. Mubaiwa in her bail appeal argued that the State has no reason to deny her liberty, as the offences it alleges were committed through her companies, where she is only a director.

She said the State was supposed to charge the companies and not her. Mubaiwa also denied ever fraudulently attempting to register her marriage with VP Chiwenga, saying how could she have prejudiced him when they were already in marriage. The State led by Mrs Sharon Fero and Mr Lovett Masuku argues that Mubaiwa was facing serious charges that could earn her at least 25 years in jail or be ordered to repay twice the amount she allegedly prejudiced the State.

Justice Kwenda reserved judgment in her bail appeal.

In her bail application on attempted murder charges, Mubaiwa said the allegations raised against her lack credibility and circumstances surrounding the charges were doubtful. She said the State only has circumstantial evidence as it alleges that the offence was committed when there was no one to witness the incident. Mubaiwa also said with the type of wounds and swells she has, it will be difficult for her to abscond.

She then handed the court pictures showing her wounds. The State led by Mr Lovett Masuka opposed granting her bail arguing that with the information the State has, she was likely to abscond. Although he could not tell when Mubaiwa will be tried, he said the State have overwhelming against her and extra-territorial investigations were still underway.

However, football administrator and businesman Keni Mubaiwa has volunteered to deposit title deeds to his properties at No.102 Seke Road as part of security and part of bail condition. Justice Kwenda also reserved judgment in her bail application.

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BAD NEWS: Hospital fees go up in Zimbabwe (SEE NEW CHARGES)

The Ministry of Health and Child Care has reviewed hospital fees with effect from 1 January 2020. This was announced by the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Dr Agnes Mahomva in a statement on Tuesday. She said the decision to increase the fees was …

The Ministry of Health and Child Care has reviewed hospital fees with effect from 1 January 2020. This was announced by the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Dr Agnes Mahomva in a statement on Tuesday. She said the decision to increase the fees was reached after taking into consideration the plight of the general populace, […]