Zim land a dead asset – finance minister 

Zimbabwe’s controversial land reform programme, which left most of its land without collateral value has meant the country is now carrying a dead asset, its Finance and Economic Development Minister Mthuli Ncube has said. Source: Zim land a dead asset – finance minister | Fin24 Before land reform, most farmers had title or property rights […]

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Zimbabwe’s controversial land reform programme, which left most of its land without collateral value has meant the country is now carrying a dead asset, its Finance and Economic Development Minister Mthuli Ncube has said.

Source: Zim land a dead asset – finance minister | Fin24

Before land reform, most farmers had title or property rights to their land, but close to 20 years after the programme, most of the land has no title and as a result, farmers have little access to loans.

The cancellation of property rights and security of tenure imposed such limitations on farmers and have had a negative impact on the southern African country’s economy.

Ncube, however, believes government can restore the collateral value of land and restore farmers’ access to billions of dollars-worth of credit that would immediately improve the country’s production volumes.

He believes dealing with the issue of land tenure and farmer compensation is critical for the country to be able to securitise its land assets.

Speaking at a breakfast meeting to review the 2019 Monetary Policy Statement, Ncube said it is critical that government restores property rights on land.

“We have created a dead asset in the form of land, and we need to turn it into a productive asset.

“One of the issues that needs to be dealt with is the issue of 99-year leases, there is still some work to do to close that off. Because without 99-year leases, we can’t create enough cover in terms of property rights for banks to extend credit to farmers,” said Ncube.

Ncube also said there is need to compensate farmers as this is a “bigger elephant in the room”.

“I must say that is an issue that I am currently seized with and I am very pleased to say that we as Government have made a lot of progress.

“We have done valuations for nine provinces and we know the values of the improvements. We should be able to conclude the evaluations by end of March.

“Only then can we start debate about securitisation of the land. We can switch to corporate finance mechanisms to compensate the farmers and launch a land bank. But the first order of business are the 99-year leases,” said Ncube.

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As the economy flounders, Zimbabweans want to leave home

Source: As the economy flounders, Zimbabweans want to leave home – Times Live The Zimbabwean flag. File photo.  Image: Natanael Alfredo Nemanita Ginting Hard hit by the economic collapse under President Emmerson Mnangagwa, Zimbabwean citizens are searching for ways to leave the country in search of opportunities abroad. It is a reversal of the public mood […]

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Source: As the economy flounders, Zimbabweans want to leave home – Times Live

The Zimbabwean flag. File photo.

The Zimbabwean flag. File photo. 
Image: Natanael Alfredo Nemanita Ginting

Hard hit by the economic collapse under President Emmerson Mnangagwa, Zimbabwean citizens are searching for ways to leave the country in search of opportunities abroad.

It is a reversal of the public mood of just 16 months ago, when the fall of former ruler Robert Mugabe in November 2017 was met with jubilation. Citizens living abroad at the time, for the first time in nearly two decades, contemplated returning home after Mugabe’s fall.

But some of those who responded swiftly to Mnangagwa’s call to return and help rebuild the country this week expressed regret over the hasty decision. They are now looking for a way out.

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Democracy Works: Rewiring Politics to Africa’s Advantage 

The Brenthurst Foundation is delighted to announce the publication of Democracy Works, a sequel to the best-selling Making Africa Work. Source: Democracy Works: Rewiring Politics to Africa’s Advantage – The Zimbabwean (Picador/Hurst/OUP, Johannesburg/London/New York, 2019) Based on more than 300 interviews across Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe with policy-makers, politicians and analysts, Democracy Works explores how we can […]

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The Brenthurst Foundation is delighted to announce the publication of Democracy Works, a sequel to the best-selling Making Africa Work.

Source: Democracy Works: Rewiring Politics to Africa’s Advantage – The Zimbabwean


(Picador/Hurst/OUP, Johannesburg/London/New York, 2019)

Based on more than 300 interviews across Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe with policy-makers, politicians and analysts, Democracy Works explores how we can learn to nurture and deepen democracy in Africa to ensure economic growth and political stability. Drawing on the considerable policy experience of its four authors – former Nigerian president Olusegun Obasanjo, Greg Mills, Jeffrey Herbst and the former Zimbabwean finance minister Tendai Biti, it identifies a ‘democratic playbook’ to meet the threats to free and fair elections. But substantive democracy demands more than simply regular polls. Democracy is fundamentally about the inner working of institutions, the rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, and leadership in government and civil society, as much as it is about values and the welfare and well-being of its citizens. It also demands that local leadership has a plan for the country beyond simply winning the popular vote.

Democracy Works is directed toward leaders and citizens who want to address the extreme demographic and other challenges that Africa faces.

‘Ethiopia shows – as does this handbook for democrats – that democracy and development are indivisible.’
Hailemariam Desalegn, former prime minister, Ethiopia

‘Clear, concise, incisive … Democracy Works deciphers a complex topic in explaining when democratic
transitions stick and why democracy works better than the alternatives.’
Mcebisi Jonas, Presidential Investment Envoy, South Africa

‘Packed with powerful ideas, valuable insights and persuasive analysis, this book is essential reading for anyone who cares about politics in Africa.’
Nic Cheeseman, University of Birmingham; author of How to Rig an Election

GREG MILLS heads the Johannesburg-based Brenthurst Foundation; OLUSEGUN OBASANJO is a former president of Nigeria; JEFFREY HERBST is the president of the American Jewish University; and TENDAI BITI is a former finance minister of Zimbabwe.

For further details, please contact Katy Roxburgh:
Katy.Roxburgh@sabistrategy.com
Direct: +44 (0) 203 880 9293
Mobile: +44 (0) 7792 819 834

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Dialogue has to be inclusive

Source: Dialogue has to be inclusive | Daily News AS one of the contesting presidential candidates in the 2018 harmonised elections, I am happy that for once President Emmerson Mnangagwa has listened to the voice of the people and decided to sit down and dialogue. As candidates and leaders of political parties when we meet […]

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Source: Dialogue has to be inclusive | Daily News

AS one of the contesting presidential candidates in the 2018 harmonised elections, I am happy that for once President Emmerson Mnangagwa has listened to the voice of the people and decided to sit down and dialogue.

As candidates and leaders of political parties when we meet with Mnangagwa we are just representing a fraction of the proposed national dialogue and it should not end or concentrate on us alone.
We have the church, the youths, women, the disabled, the businesses community, non-governmental organisations and even the diplomatic community who all have to contribute their input as we develop an inclusive dialogue.

I have been attending the meetings with Mngangwa so far and what we are still working on is a framework to the dialogue; the dialogue hasn’t started yet. But time is not on our side!
The national dialogue in my opinion should be well structured and possibly have a secretariat running its activities every day. Like I said politicians are just but a fraction of the whole dialogue.
In any dialogue of this nature there is need to put time frames to the talks and we should be able to have targets and measure our success.

The call for a neutral mediator is quite a crucial aspect to the success of any such dialogue and you want to have someone of international standing; hence the lessons learnt when we had our first Government of National Unity which brought Zanu PF leaders and MDC leaders together resulting in a power sharing arrangement.
That dialogue was a result of constant, painful negotiation with a full secretarial running around to make sure things worked.

The president may as of now lead us as politicians on working a framework to the talks, but the national dialogue involving all stakeholders has to have an independent chair because Mnangagwa is an interested party. As Dop we think ultimately after all the negotiations and dialogue the resultant government must be controlled by a broad representative of all significant parties.

The new government system should be based on proportionality, especially with regards the political parties and other stakeholders’ representations. We would also recommend that all political parties no matter how minor or insignificant must have veto power concerning issues of vital and fundamental importance.

Judging from other countries that have adopted coalition based governments, the compromise and co-operation inherent to governing through sharing power has helped power their societies to prosperity. Over the past 10 years, coalition governments have become the norm throughout Europe and Germany is a good example of how effective a coalition government can be in overcoming divisions and creating shared prosperity.

The coalition’s first task is to regain international investors’ confidence, hence capitalising on the international goodwill which would have been generated by a change of government.
The next step would be to improve skills development; introduce a countrywide apprenticeship programme that trains young people emerging from school to become mechanics, plumbers, boilermakers and electricians.

We need to invest in technical colleges, including teacher and nursing training colleges which would incorporate compulsory apprenticeship programmes designed to stream line the transtion into employment.

We also need to improve on our human rights record, observe rule of law and Constitution. In order for the coalition to be successful and stay in power, all members of the coalition government must retain the respect of voters by working together. Political parties would need to compromise on an agreed manifesto in order to achieve the best possible outcome under any given coalition arrangement.

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TEACHING PROFESSION COUNCIL MOOTED FOR ZIM

Government is working on establishing a Teaching Profession Council (TPC) under which teachers will apply for registration before being issued with a teaching practice certificate. The proposed changes are contained in the Teaching Profession Council B…

Government is working on establishing a Teaching Profession Council (TPC) under which teachers will apply for registration before being issued with a teaching practice certificate. The proposed changes are contained in the Teaching Profession Council Bill which is expected to provide for the regulation of the educators, their practice and professional conduct. Public hearings to solicit views on