PREGNANT WOMAN BEATEN OVER RTGS$6, MISCARRIES

A HWANGE woman miscarried after being attacked by her
neighbour who owed her RTGS$6.

Gracious Moyo (24) of E20 Sinderela Village owed a
six-weeks pregnant Thandolwenkosi Ndlovu but seemed to be taking too long to
pay back.

As such, Ndlovu’s con…

A HWANGE woman miscarried after being attacked by her neighbour who owed her RTGS$6. Gracious Moyo (24) of E20 Sinderela Village owed a six-weeks pregnant Thandolwenkosi Ndlovu but seemed to be taking too long to pay back. As such, Ndlovu’s constant demand for her money became an annoying jingle in Moyo’s ears and she beat her up leading to the miscarriage. For that, Moyo appeared

LIVE GUINEA FOWL WITCHCRAFT SHAKES FAMILY

FOR several people, the first thing that comes to mind when
coming face to face with strange objects, in one’s yard, is that it can be
related to witchcraft.

This is exactly what happened to one family from Bulawayo’s
Mpopoma suburb who got the sh…

FOR several people, the first thing that comes to mind when coming face to face with strange objects, in one’s yard, is that it can be related to witchcraft. This is exactly what happened to one family from Bulawayo’s Mpopoma suburb who got the shock of their lives when they found strange objects suspected to be witchcraft paraphernalia dumped inside their yard. The incident which sent

Chaos as man returns from abroad and finds wife with coloured baby, threatens to spill blood

A HEARTSORE man caused a rumpus at court when he threatened to spill blood after his application for a peace order against a man who impregnated his wife was dismissed by the magistrate for inadequate evidence. It appears Beven Charwadza from Insiza co…

A HEARTSORE man caused a rumpus at court when he threatened to spill blood after his application for a peace order against a man who impregnated his wife was dismissed by the magistrate for inadequate evidence. It appears Beven Charwadza from Insiza couldn’t fathom the ruling by Bulawayo magistrate Rachael Mukanga when he started shouting […]

I had sex with Mangoma several times: Woman confesses to enjoying sex with hubby’s friend in court

A Zvishavane businessman has been dragged to the Civil Court for allegedly bedding his friend’s wife. The friendship between the two men has since gone sour following the “great” betrayal. Norris Sibanda, a gold dealer, is demanding $…

A Zvishavane businessman has been dragged to the Civil Court for allegedly bedding his friend’s wife. The friendship between the two men has since gone sour following the “great” betrayal. Norris Sibanda, a gold dealer, is demanding $1 400 from his friend Reuben Mangoma, who allegedly slept with Sibanda’s wife, Tendai Sibanda, on several occasions. […]

Disaster as man axes neighbour to death following dispute over a tree

A 61-YEAR-OLD man from Kezi in Matobo district appeared in court for allegedly axing his neighbour to death when he confronted him for chopping a tree near his homestead. Phillion Ndiweni (63) of Mashumba village fatally axed Mr Julius Ndlovu (64) foll…

A 61-YEAR-OLD man from Kezi in Matobo district appeared in court for allegedly axing his neighbour to death when he confronted him for chopping a tree near his homestead. Phillion Ndiweni (63) of Mashumba village fatally axed Mr Julius Ndlovu (64) following a dispute over a tree which the accused person was cutting for firewood. […]

Transport Minister Joel Biggie Matiza suspends VID officers with immediate effect (SEE NAMES)

Government has — with immediate effect — suspended Vehicle Inspectorate Department (VID) officials from Marondera and Beitbridge depots on allegations of corruptly issuing provisional driver’s licences to undeserving people. Those sus…

Government has — with immediate effect — suspended Vehicle Inspectorate Department (VID) officials from Marondera and Beitbridge depots on allegations of corruptly issuing provisional driver’s licences to undeserving people. Those suspended in Marondera are depot manager Mr S. Kachere and his two subordinates Messrs J. Musosi and D. Chingwaru, while in Beitbridge acting depot manager […]

Latest on Zimbabwe’s NEW currency: President Emmerson Mnangagwa sheds more light

Government is working on modalities to introduce a new currency, which will be the sole legal tender for domestic transactions as fundamentals have now been put in place, President Mnangagwa has said. In an interview with business media outlet, Bloombe…

Government is working on modalities to introduce a new currency, which will be the sole legal tender for domestic transactions as fundamentals have now been put in place, President Mnangagwa has said. In an interview with business media outlet, Bloomberg, on the sidelines of the 12th US-Africa Business Summit in Maputo, Mozambique, on Thursday, the […]

NEW BOARD FOR NATPHARM

Renowned medical practitioner Dr Billy Rigava is the new
chairman of the National Pharmaceutical Company (NatPharm) following his
appointment by Health and Child Care Minister Dr Obadiah Moyo in Harare
yesterday.  Dr Rigava, a past president
of the…

Renowned medical practitioner Dr Billy Rigava is the new chairman of the National Pharmaceutical Company (NatPharm) following his appointment by Health and Child Care Minister Dr Obadiah Moyo in Harare yesterday.  Dr Rigava, a past president of the Zimbabwe Medical Association (ZIMA), the Private Hospitals Association (PHA) and many other professional bodies, was appointed together with

VID BRIBES : FIVE SUSPENDED

Government has — with immediate effect — suspended Vehicle
Inspectorate Department (VID) officials from Marondera and Beitbridge depots on
allegations of corruptly issuing provisional driver’s licences to undeserving
people. Those suspended in Maro…

Government has — with immediate effect — suspended Vehicle Inspectorate Department (VID) officials from Marondera and Beitbridge depots on allegations of corruptly issuing provisional driver’s licences to undeserving people. Those suspended in Marondera are depot manager Mr S. Kachere and his two subordinates Messrs J. Musosi and D. Chingwaru, while in Beitbridge acting depot manager K

What brought so many Irish people to live in Zimbabwe?

Source: What brought so many Irish people to live in Zimbabwe? – Irish Times First St Patrick’s day celebrated on 1891 in a roofless mud-hut building with whiskey, gin and ham Arriving with my family to live in Harare, Zimbabwe almost four years ago, we were met by the then president of the Mashonaland Irish Association (MIA) and taken out […]

The post What brought so many Irish people to live in Zimbabwe? appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

Source: What brought so many Irish people to live in Zimbabwe? – Irish Times

First St Patrick’s day celebrated on 1891 in a roofless mud-hut building with whiskey, gin and ham

Sir Charles Coghlan third from left receiving an honorary degree from Trinity 1926.

Sir Charles Coghlan third from left receiving an honorary degree from Trinity 1926.

Arriving with my family to live in HarareZimbabwe almost four years ago, we were met by the then president of the Mashonaland Irish Association (MIA) and taken out for a typical “full Irish” breakfast in hot January sunshine the following morning. It was a warm Irish welcome and encouraged us to attend an MIA committee meeting the following month. I soon learned I’d been elected to the committee and later that year elected president, perhaps proving Woody Allen’s dictum that success in life is mostly about turning up.

I quickly became aware just how august and illustrious the MIA actually was. Not only is it the oldest expatriate association in the country, but it’s likely the oldest Irish association on the African continent. After my presidency, and aware we’d passed our 125th anniversary, I decided to compile and edit a book reflecting on the association’s history and in turn the contribution of the Irish to Zimbabwe, and visa versa. I received and encouraged articles from historians, scholars, writers, poets, musicians, missionaries and ex-MIA presidents. Items and pictures arrived from as far afield as Canada, and of course Ireland, and I became aware of a secondary Irish diaspora that of Irish people born in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe who had grown up here and subsequently left to settle elsewhere.

There were also a significant population of people who had come here for a number of decades but eventually packed up and left. The range of articles reflected the diversity of the Irish experience, and to begin with was an account of the first raucous St Patrick’s Day banquet celebrated in 1891.

St Patrick’s Day 1891 invite.
St Patrick’s Day 1891 invite.

In Irish chronological terms this might appear recent, but in colonial terms this predated the foundation of Southern Rhodesia, later Rhodesia and was a mere seven months after the Pioneer Column on expedition from south Africa, established camp at Fort Salisbury (now Harare) and raised the Union Jack on Cecil (now Africa Unity) Square.

Fort Salisbury from photographs of the period appears like a dusty sun-baked crossroads with a few brick and indigenous rondavel buildings. The banquet took place in a roofless mud-brick building, which when finished would become the first hotel in Salisbury. While conditions were primitive, the right spirit was insufficient measure; wines, whiskey, Delagoa Bay gin and a ham were procured from the wagon of the aristocratic Compte de la Panouse who followed the column with his wares and delicacies. A copy of the handwritten invitation bearing the words “Céad Mile Failte” and signed by the first MIA chairman, Sgt FKW Major Lyons-Montgomery, is reprinted in the book.

The MIA have celebrated St Patrick’s Day ever since and enhanced it with cultural programmes, charitable activities and support for the increasingly elderly Irish and people of Irish decent here. Articles received ranged from colonial Anglo-Irish to Jewish-Irish to people simply searching for a better life, or in the case of the religious, wanting to better people’s lives. Some of the material resurrected personalities or remembered our more famous daughters and sons.

One such example is Mother Patrick or Mary Ann Cosgrave, a Carmelite nun from Summerhill, Co Meath who sailed to south Africa in 1890 and spent a further year and a half travelling with five Sisters by ox-cart to Salisbury where she established a hospital and a school. Such was her selfless care for the sick, she was awarded the Royal Red Cross by Queen Victoria in 1898 but only two years later, at the age of 37, succumbed to tuberculosis.

She soon became part of the iconography of the oddly ecumenical Southern Rhodesia enhanced by an ailing Cecil Rhodes attending her funeral. Soon afterwards the MIA erected a Celtic cross, modelled after the one in Monasterboice near Drogheda, above her grave. As part of the St Patrick’s Day festivities a pilgrimage took place annually to her grave, which lasted until the 1970s.

Mother Patrick on a Rhodesia stamp in 1970.
Mother Patrick on a Rhodesia stamp in 1970.

Sir Charles Coghlan, the first prime minister of Southern Rhodesia,  would have headed up these pilgrimages in the 1920s. South African born Coghlan regarded himself as “a Catholic of Irish name and extraction”, shortly before he died in 1926 he was awarded an Honorary Degree in Trinity College, Dublin and was reputedly the first Catholic to be so awarded.

Posthumously, he was the last person interred in “World’s View”, Matopos in 1930 near the grave of Cecil Rhodes who decreed that the hill of stone, sacred to the Matabele, be a “Valhalla” for those who “deserved well of their country”.

Many settlers were simply adventurers, seeking a better life. The Rubenstein’s in response to growing anti-Semitism in Lithuania left for Ireland in the late 1870s, naturalised, and settled in “Little Jerusalem” in South Circular Road, Dublin.

At the turn of the century, they emigrated again to Southern Rhodesia and became an integral part of the burgeoning Jewish community in BulawayoBeverley Mathison remembers her grandmother in Bulawayo playing Irish tunes on her piano, her strong Irish accent and cooking Jewish and Irish dishes.

There are of course many more contemporary examples and one such is Ken Ryan’s account of coming out to Rhodesia the day after his wedding and creating a prosperous life here before tragedy in different guises struck. On return to Ireland in the 1980s he gets to have a second chance, flourishes and remains intensely loyal to Zimbabwe.

Finally, Prof Donal P McCracken contributes an essay superbly contextualising the Irish in southern Africa while Prof Donal Lowry in covering the period between 1910 and 2019 considers what he sees as colonial analogies and ethnic echoes in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe and Ireland in what he terms, “A mirror to Ireland’s face”.

The connections and threads between the two countries are manifest not just in the abundance of Irish place names here. Cumulatively, and beyond the stories of individuals, it’s a narrative that provides new insights into the layered complexity of the Irish and the colonial experience, and the adaption of the Irish first in Rhodesia and now Zimbabwe.

Joseph Woods is a poet and writer. The Mashonaland Irish Association, a Miscellany 1891-2019, is published by Weaver Press.

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