Chamisa on diplomatic charm offensive

Source: Chamisa on diplomatic charm offensive | Newsday (News) BY OBEY MANAYITI MDC leader, Nelson Chamisa is on a diplomatic charm offensive, seeking solidarity at a time other African leaders are warning up to President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s administration. Although officials close to Chamisa refused to divulge the countries and leaders that he is set to […]

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Source: Chamisa on diplomatic charm offensive | Newsday (News)

BY OBEY MANAYITI

MDC leader, Nelson Chamisa is on a diplomatic charm offensive, seeking solidarity at a time other African leaders are warning up to President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s administration.

Although officials close to Chamisa refused to divulge the countries and leaders that he is set to meet, claiming that the hosts do not want to be known, he previously raised concern over regional leaders’ failure to intervene in the Zimbabwean crisis.

Chamisa has also reportedly requested to meet South African President Cyril Ramaphosa during his forthcoming trip to Zimbabwe in a few weeks’ time.

In a terse statement on Tuesday, the party’s director of communication, Luke Tamborinyoka revealed that his boss will be embarking on a diplomatic offensive.

“President Nelson Chamisa is out of the country on a diplomatic offensive in Africa to sensitise the continent on the situation in Zimbabwe,” Tamborinyoka said.

“The MDC leader’s diplomatic engagement drive comes hard on the heels of a State-sponsored brutal onslaught on innocent Zimbabweans as well as a callous attempt to decimate the party by targeting its elected leaders as well as party structures.”

Zimbabwe was on the agenda at the Sadc meeting held on the sidelines of the African Union summit recently. The summit was held at the height of State-sponsored crackdown following countrywide protests against the leadership of Mnangagwa.

Instead, Sadc condemned the maintenance of sanctions against the Mnangagwa government.

MDC officials yesterday said Chamisa is also taking the opportunity to update some African leaders about the situation in the country.

“Some of the leaders that the president is meeting have requested not to be named and, obviously, they have their own reasons. If we, therefore, divulge we might end up jeopardising the whole issue,” an MDC official said.

“However, the fact of the matter is that there are some African leaders who didn’t buy into Mnangagwa’s propaganda and they are willing to hear the other side from Chamisa. The nation will be told about the mission at an appropriate time,” the official added.

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Zim in dire need of a new health strategy

Source: Zim in dire need of a new health strategy – DailyNews Live Ernest Gwinyai and Alex Majongwe      28 February 2019 In this paper we look at a number of issues including the challenges Zimbabwe has experienced post 2000. These are reduced healthcare investment, escalating healthcare costs and poor service delivery. In short […]

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Source: Zim in dire need of a new health strategy – DailyNews Live

Ernest Gwinyai and Alex Majongwe      28 February 2019

In this paper we look at a number of issues including the challenges
Zimbabwe has experienced post 2000. These are reduced healthcare
investment, escalating healthcare costs and poor service delivery. In
short the great gains in health delivery since independence have been
lost.

The neglect in healthcare delivery over the past 20 years is evident.

Under these circumstances, it is important to subscribe to the need to
protect the poor and disadvantaged groups from the negative effects of
health care inaccessibility. We further argue that the existing structure,
conduct and performance of our health delivery system together with
existing economic circumstances have made it difficult to protect
vulnerable groups.

Even those members on medical aid and insurance schemes are not getting
the full value and benefit from their contributions thus eroding
confidence in healthcare. Restructuring of healthcare delivery is long
overdue.

Zimbabwe’s population is currently estimated at 16.2 million. Of this less
than 2 million have access to private healthcare. Fourteen million have to
access healthcare through the public facilities.

There is a problem with access as the tax base from which financial
resources come continues to shrink.

The recently introduced 2 percent tax on mobile money transactions will
make a difference. Our health system is 70 percent public owned with the
balance of 30 percent is private.

With 90 percent of public healthcare institutions without essential
medicines and consumables in stock patients must rely on private
pharmacies whose pricing is excessive. This has compounded healthcare
delivery.

Pricing in a black market-driven environment has made it difficult to
price medical drugs at replacement value. Government has a significant
role because of its direct influence over allocation and utilisation of
financial resources.

There are opportunities to widen healthcare through already existing
interventionist policies which are already making it possible for the
presently marginalised to access healthcare.  A health levy fund (part
NHIS) is dependent on funds mobilisation and a wider tax base.

The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) is a financing vehicle to
enable marginalised members of society to access health delivery services.
It is not about taking the route other countries have followed but having
systems and structures that ensure the poor access healthcare but rather
even employing components of it.

The promoter is usually government. Presently the modus operandi is still
under scrutiny but expected to be operational in future. This could be
funded through various initiatives as is the case with our National Aid s
levy and 2 percent mobile money tax. The real challenge is when economic
activity is not scaled up as government needs a wider tax base to generate
the funding.

Whether NHIS would establish a transitional fund to purchase primary
healthcare services from certified public and private providers or would
abolish user fees in public hospitals remains to be seen.

Health reforms are necessary from a funding perspective to ensure health
accessibility by all.

Such schemes are not easy to implement as they usually work better in
formal structured economies, a missing link in most African economies.
This is so because they are pivoted on substantial and consistent revenue
streams and funding which the informal sector is in most cases unable to
present. Most African economies have their informal sector growing at the
expense of the formal sector making revenue collection difficult.

Recent reports indicate that government collected US$18 million since
February 2017 to December 2017 from $0.05 levied on mobile users per every
dollar of airtime. The health fund levy was targeted towards drugs and
equipment and operationalised since the 2016 National budget.

In November 2018 government increased the intermediated financial
transactions tax from USD 0.05 per transaction to USD 0.02 for every
dollar transacted. According to the Zimbabwe Revenue Authority (Zimra)’s
2018 annual revenue performance report, a total $177 266, 319.04 was
collected between October and December 2018. If these receipts are
directed towards healthcare it is possible medicines and drug supplies
will improve for the benefit of all.

This initiative is a brilliant masterstroke given obtaining circumstances.
The Aids Levy revenue taxed on formally employed people has been affected
due to job losses making it difficult for government to fully finance
health resulting in more reliance on development partners. In 2017
development partners have disbursed US$279 Million against government’s
US$249 Million.

Health is increasingly being recognised as a driver of human and economic
development. African countries are increasing investments and reforms to
improve health outcomes.

While some rich countries are finding it increasingly difficult to keep up
with rising healthcare costs owing to the global economic challenges they
have not reduced health allocations. According to the World Health
Organisation the average total health expenditure in African countries
stood at US$135 per capita in 2010 which is a small fraction of
US$3 150 spent on health in an average high-income country.

For Zimbabwe the per capita health expenditure was US$24.34 in 2016
compared to US$40 for Zambia and US$593 for South Africa and US$7 285 for
the United States of America.

Zimbabwe had the lowest allocation of approximately 8.3 percent of the
total budget to health within the region, a ratio way below the stipulated
15 percent. In 2017 allocation to health was just 6.9 percent.

It is, however, encouraging that the 2017/18 averaged budget is
approximately 9 percent.

In most countries healthcare systems fail not because of limited financial
resources but rather their allocation. The biggest weakness is the
oversight of this key area at the expense of other non-essential and
undeserving areas. This negatively affects national health delivery.

A look at how healthcare is being handled in other countries is important.
South Africa allocates about 14 percent  to health as a share of total
government expenditures versus 11 percent and below by most African
countries. Zimbabwe has over the past 3 years allocated an average of 8
percent annually of the national budget to health. This means that in
simple ratio terms South Africa allocates double to health compared to
Zimbabwe.

In South Africa, government health expenditure as a percentage of total
health expenditure increased from 40 percent in 2006 to 48 percent in 2013
and more in the following years. Over the same period external funding
decreased from 2.3 percent to 1.8 percent of Total Health Expenditure
meaning less reliance on donor support. Out of pocket expenditures have
also declined over the years.

South Africa has 83 private medical aid schemes that fund healthcare for
about 16 percent of their population. The schemes cover formal sector
workers and in some cases, their dependents. The remaining 84 percent of
the population relies on tax-funded health services and include the
informal sector employees, unemployed or the poor and disadvantaged.
Countries that have increased their budget allocations to health over the
years have recorded improved health statistics and outcomes. We should not
be left behind.

Globally, health expenditure per capita has been rising. Zimbabwe appears
to be moving in the opposite direction. 98 percent of drugs and medicines
used in public health centres are donor funded.

In the midst of these challenges the Health ministry must think outside
the box. It is not just about resources but how these resources are
allocated and utilised. This demands a thorough review of existing systems
and responsibilities including health management and administration.

Zimbabwe has a low doctor and nurse to patient ratio but has many
unemployed nurses and doctors including other critical medical personnel.
At 1.6 doctors and 7 nurses and midwives per 10 000 people against a
recommended 1: 600. The Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation put
Zimbabwe’s maternal mortality ratio in 1990 at 185.8 deaths per 100,000
live births, rising to 840.9 in 2003 and then dipping to 520.7 in 2013
with recent estimates at 614.

Further Zimbabwe’s per capita allocation of US$24.34 is significantly
lower than its regional peers whose average is US$146.29. This is lower
than World Health Organisation target of US$34.

We must craft a healthcare policy framework that places health at the
centre of our national economic development plan. Beyond that, we must
create awareness and proactive measures focusing on personal health.
Improving the quality and effectiveness of primary healthcare would combat
secondary and tertiary healthcare related complications which will have a
positive effect on healthcare delivery in general.

Options that give sustainable solutions even in the face of competing
priorities are needed.

First, we must pay more attention to detail about our current situation.
The sector has since year 2000 faced high personnel turnover fuelled by
poor salaries and conditions of services for doctors, nurses and other
health personnel. Zimbabwe is failing to employ its own trained doctors,
nurses and other health skills in both its private and public
institutions.

There is need for a collective dialogue that should be engaged to create
meaningful and productive opportunities for the health sector.

Employment costs take 85 percent of the allocated budget. The ratio has
not changed and leaves very little for other critical expenditure lines.

Combined government and cooperating partners allocations have increased
from US$545 Million in 2016 to approximately US$ 1.2 Billion in 2019 with
50 percent coming from cooperating partners.

Effective healthcare regulatory bodies supported by strong governance
frameworks are important. We advocate strong systems which consolidate
healthcare delivery and are capable of identifying and rectifying
variances and deviations.  Obadiah Moyo the new minister of Health has an
immediate task to revamp and streamline the current regulatory framework
and systems.

Second the issue of allocation and utilisation is important. The previous
minister in 2017 requested at least US$1 billion towards health. It was
justified. To fix the healthcare problem there is more to the toolkit than
just financial resources.

Focus should not just be on hospitals, pharmacies and related
infrastructure but also accommodation for doctors and nurses in out laying
areas to make them more habitable.

Worsening indices of health status in Zimbabwe demand a new strategy on
the way our health system is organised and how this system will address
the complex causal pathways that lie beyond the health sector. The
structural changes being advocated are not confined to government and
public sector alone but just that government is a key player in
determining success. Alongside are the private sector and development
partners in their value adding roles.

Private companies must change course and reconsider their healthcare
models in the interest of cutting costs and creating both value and
quality. At national level, health must be seen as the foundation of
national development. While government recognises this the major concern
is with implementation which is lagging behind. The National Health
Strategy needs a revisit.

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ED shelves Zanu PF solidarity march

Source: ED shelves Zanu PF solidarity march | Newsday (News) BY OBEY MANAYITI/RICHARD CHIDZA PRESIDENT Emmerson Mnangagwa has reportedly shelved plans by the Zanu PF youth league to march in support of his Presidency because of the astronomical budget put forward to ferry supporters from across the country amid reports that some within the ruling […]

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Source: ED shelves Zanu PF solidarity march | Newsday (News)

BY OBEY MANAYITI/RICHARD CHIDZA

PRESIDENT Emmerson Mnangagwa has reportedly shelved plans by the Zanu PF youth league to march in support of his Presidency because of the astronomical budget put forward to ferry supporters from across the country amid reports that some within the ruling party fear the timing would be insensitive to the current challenges facing the nation.

Although the youth league has been given full mandate to mobilise resources for the event and to get assistance from the main wing, the planned march, which could cost millions of dollars, is facing resistance on many fronts.

According to a letter signed by Zanu PF national commissar, Engelbert Rugeje, the rally is aimed at gathering some 300 000 Zanu PF supporters in Harare.

“You are instructed to convene provincial co-ordinating committees tomorrow February 26 to be addressed by the most senior party members on the following matters: The need to mobilise adequate resources to transport a minimum of 30 000 people from your province to Harare to participate in the solidarity march in support of HE (His Excellency) the
President Cde ED Mnangagwa on March 2, 2019,” Rugeje’s letter dated February 25, reads.

Zanu-PF party’s national political commissar Retired Lieutenant-General Engelbert Rugeje yesterday addresses party supporters at a meeting in Tsholotsho yesterday.Listening from left is member of parliament for Tsholotsho South constituency Cde Zenzo Sibanda

The retired general was not available for comment yesterday.

According to Rugeje, the Zanu PF commissariat was going to allocate 10 000 litres of fuel to Bulawayo, Matabeleland North and South, 15 000 to Harare, the same quantity to

Manicaland and Midlands, 18 750 to Mashonaland East the same quantity to Mashonaland West, Central and Masvingo.

This would translate to nearly $500 000 worth of fuel. But highly-placed sources said Mnangagwa, desperate to get national buy-in for his reform agenda, requested that the budget be revised downwards.

“The President does not want to project an image of unnecessary extravagance, so he asked that the budget be re-looked at. His argument was that the party must explain why there is need to bring 270 000 people from other provinces to Harare for a rally,” NewsDay heard from one source.

Zanu PF finance secretary, Patrick Chinamasa referred questions to party spokesperson, Simon Khaya Moyo, who said the party will throw its weight behind the event.

“It’s a solidarity rally by the youth league and is fully supported by the party. I would not know finer details or whether the President was not happy with the budget, the youth league should be able to clarify that,” Khaya Moyo said.

National youth league commissar, Godfrey Tsenengamu could not be drawn into commenting on the budget issue, but insisted that the solidarity march will be happening next weekend.

He said those that are purportedly opposing the programme might be remnants of Zanu PF’s G40 or Gamatox factions.

“I cannot comment on the alleged bloated cost of the rally. As commissar, my job is to organise people. I did and (I) am still doing that. As regards the expenditure for the event, please check with the national secretary for administration or secretary for finance,” he said.

Tsenengamu said the programme was necessary because they felt Mnangagwa was under siege.

“We believe our leader is under attack, locally and internationally. There are countries like the USA [United States], who are always criticising him and we need to show support for our leader. Locally, we have parties that are talking about the transitional government,” he said.

“We are gathering to show support for our leader. He won the elections and he cannot be distracted by noise coming from other areas. We will always have Gamatox and G40 remnants and it is not surprising that we will have dissenting voices within the party, but we will not agree at the same time, all the times.”

The cancellation of the party event comes at a time there is growing tension within Zanu PF with other officials questioning the ability of Mnangagwa to deal with the worsening socio-economic and political crises.

Others are arguing that the solidarity march, which is likely to gobble millions of dollars, is an unnecessary move that will only bring back memories of “Mugabe’s ruinous days”.

However, Tsenengamu said: “If there are people in Zanu PF, who are opposed to this event, they must use internal mechanisms to address it. Within the party, there are organs to deal with such issues so that we focus on external factors that are opposing our President.

“This is a youth league programme and we have a right to do our programmes uninterrupted. If those that are not happy are from the main wing or women’s league then they must follow laid down channels to register their displeasure.”

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Spare a thought for Dzamara’s traumatised wife

Source: Spare a thought for Dzamara’s traumatised wife | Daily News SHEFFRA Dzamara is not relenting in her demand for justice for those behind the disappearance of her husband, Itai Dzamara, nearly four years ago.Her husband was getting a haircut one morning in Budiriro when four men bundled him into an unmarked vehicle and sped […]

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Source: Spare a thought for Dzamara's traumatised wife | Daily News

SHEFFRA Dzamara is not relenting in her demand for justice for those behind the disappearance of her husband, Itai Dzamara, nearly four years ago.Her husband was getting a haircut one morning in Budiriro when four men bundled him into an unmarked vehicle and sped off.

His whereabouts and the identities of those behind his kidnapping have remained unknown ever since.

Many suspect that Dzamara’s disappearance was on account of his political activities, which could have offended the powers-that-be and led them to take matters into their own hands.

He was one of the most outspoken critics of former president Robert Mugabe.

Dzamara, like many others, openly fingered Mugabe for turning what was once viewed as Africa’s most promising economy into a basket-case.

Because of his convictions, he abandoned his job at one of the country’s business weeklies and founded Occupy Africa Unity Square — a social movement that called for Mugabe’s resignation.

A few months before his abduction, Dzamara had authored a petition which he delivered along with other activists — Philosophy Nyapfumbi and Tichaona Danho — to the Office of the President, immediately landing them into trouble with the police.

While they were released a few hours later without being harmed, Dzamara became a marked man from then on.

Although government says it has no hand in Dzamara’s disappearance, all fingers point towards it.

Still troubled by the incident and burdened by the unenviable task of looking after their two children — Nokutenda and Nenyasha — Dzamara’s wife, Sheffra, is a broken but strong woman.

From the day her husband was seized from a barber shop in Budiriro, Sheffra has so many unanswered questions which not even the new administration of President Emmerson Mnangagwa has been able to provide answers to.

Of Sheffra, Itai’s brother Patson had this to say“It’s been hard for Itai’s immediate family, Itai has a wife and two children and I’m sure the burden of curiosity eats them up especially the young boy now in Grade 3.

“He is aware of what really happened and he is the one who is more affected than the little girl, but the little girl is also now in a place where she is also becoming inquisitive because she has a hazy picture of what transpired. She cannot connect all the dots but she has an idea and that makes her inquisitive”.

Indeed, no child ever wants to live without their daddy. Equally, no wife wants to ever raise her children without their father by her side. Sadly, this has been the situation for Sheffra and only God can heal her broken heart. Nokutenda and Nenyasha have been Sheffra’s main source of great hope for she sees in them a brighter future.

If Dzamara was still alive, he would have been aged 39 years.On March 9, it will exactly be four years following his disappearance.The coming month would therefore act as a reminder for Sheffra and others who are still searching for clues over his disappearance.Sheffra stood by her activist husband in his efforts to push Mugabe into relinquishing office.

Less than two years after his disappearance, Mugabe was removed from office by none other than his military which felt that its commander-in-chief was no longer fit to rule.

If Dzamara was to appear in Zimbabwe today, probably his reception would be like that of Nelson Mandela, who fought for a huge cause of political revolution and democracy. His foresighted social movement calling for Mugabe to resign has since come to pass but unfortunately, Dzamara was not there to see his dream come true.

In one of her interviews in March last year Sheffra is quoted saying Mugabe’s resignation had come three years too late.

“This was what Itai had started, that Mugabe must go,” she says. “I was happy my husband was the first one to start it.”

About the new administration, she doubts if it has the political will to deliver back her husband.

“We thought that since Mugabe resigned, we would finally have peace and my husband would return or we would learn what happened to him,” she was quoted saying.

“He (Mnangagwa) said ‘let bygones be bygones’”, says Sheffra of the new president.

“I’m not sure, but it sounded like he was saying what happened has happened. In the case of my husband, no, it’s not a bygone.

“We will keep pushing until they’ve given us an answer.”

According to an account published in African Arguments, Sheffra first met Itai on a commuter omnibus as they both travelled to their homes in the Harare suburb of Highfield after work.

She worked for a printing company and he was a reporter for a local business weekly.

Over time, she recounts, the two fell in love.

Itai honoured Sheffra and her family by paying the traditional bride price, allowing them to have a church wedding.

In the interview, Sheffra described Itai as a generous husband, who used to help his mother-in-law provide for her younger siblings and pay their school fees.

The couple’s last moments together were happy ones.

As Itai left the house to get a haircut, Sheffra asked him what she should iron for him to wear that day.

“You know how it is when you are proud of your husband,” she was quoted saying. “I wanted him to always look smart. I was ready to iron his clothes again to make him look extra neat, even though I had ironed them the night before. ”Itai laughed, she recalls, telling her he was happy to wear the clothes as they were. The vehicles that were used in Itai’s abduction later that morning were unmarked.

“He was taken at about 10am,” Sheffra said. “They told me around 11am, after an hour. They thought Itai’s abductors might still be in the area. Because of that I was terrified. ”She reported the matter at Harare Central Police Station accompanied by lawyers Charles Kwaramba and Kennedy Masiye. The police refused to assist her, saying she should go to Glen Norah Police Station instead. The next day, Sheffra succeeded in opening a docket on the kidnapping case under RRB Number 2391750.

In the following days, she heard rumours and received text messages saying Itai had been thrown in acid or been murdered. These have remained just that — rumours. Up to this day, police are still to make a headway in their investigations but there is little hope that Dzamara will be found.

 

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‘After Mnangagwa’s tenure, it will be my turn to become Zimbabwe’s president’

Many people view Vice President Constantino Chiwenga as next in line to succeed President Emmerson Mnangagwa the other vice president, Kembo Mohadi has shown keen interest for the top job, saying his history was as illustrious as his boss’. Mohadi said…

Many people view Vice President Constantino Chiwenga as next in line to succeed President Emmerson Mnangagwa the other vice president, Kembo Mohadi has shown keen interest for the top job, saying his history was as illustrious as his boss’. Mohadi said he believed fate was on his side, claiming the road travelled by President Mnangagwa […]

Probe into Gukurahundi era begins

Source: Probe into Gukurahundi era begins | Daily News WORK by the National Peace and Reconciliation Commission (NPRC) to compile information on what really happened during the Gukurahundi era will begin next month. Commissioner Leslie Ncube told the Daily News on Tuesday that the NPRC will from mid next month start to gather as much information as […]

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Source: Probe into Gukurahundi era begins | Daily News

WORK by the National Peace and Reconciliation Commission (NPRC) to compile information on what really happened during the Gukurahundi era will begin next month.
Commissioner Leslie Ncube told the Daily News on Tuesday that the NPRC will from mid next month start to gather as much information as possible as part of the building blocks towards national healing.
He encouraged the affected communities to engage truthfully and to co-operate fully with the commission.

“…we want to meet everyone and tell each other the truth; that’s how we are going to deal with this matter — as a united front,” he said.
An estimated 20 000 defenceless civilians died during the Gukurahundi era when then Prime Minister Robert Mugabe unleashed a North Korean-trained army unit to crack on alleged dissent to his rule in Midlands and Matabeleland.

In 2011, Genocide Watch, along with the International Association of Genocide Scholars, classified Gukurahundi as genocide.
President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who served Mugabe’s right-hand man for nearly 54 years, last year operationalised the NPRC as part of efforts to address unresolved national issues, including the Gukurahundi atrocities. Mnangagwa has distanced himself from the 1980s disturbances, mandating the NPRC and traditional leaders to tackle the issue.

While the commission was well received in many quarters, it was not the same in Matabeleland region where many human rights activists refused to recognise it on the basis of its composition.
The activists felt that the commission would be biased in its operations since it only has one Ndebele speaking member in its ranks. Irked by this lopsided composition, the activists disrupted the NPRC’s inaugural national consultation meetings in Matabeleland last year.

Ncube said the commission would have to trace all mass graves in the affected communities to gather evidence of the post-independence killings.
He said the issue of exhumation will not be hurried as there are processes to be followed.
“People in communities know the mass graves that are in their areas….We will be listening to you to lead the process at that local level.

“Come to the meetings with a plan of what you want to happen because we will be using participatory methods; we don’t want to plan for people. Our job is not in the office – it’s on the ground because this is where the killings allegedly happened,” Ncube explained.

Remains of the Gukurahundi victims continue to be uncovered in some parts of Matabeleland, particularly in Lupane and Maphisa, which bore the brunt of the mass killings.
However, there have not been any government-sanctioned exhumations, forensics or reburials to date.

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A question for national dialogue

Source: A question for national dialogue | Daily News A NATIONAL dialogue for this country to find a ‘suitable political proposition’ for the Zimbabwean masses is necessary. In fact, it was necessary as far back as 1980 right after independence. Sadly, no such a national dialogue was held. This village idiot will give thumbs up to […]

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Source: A question for national dialogue | Daily News

A NATIONAL dialogue for this country to find a ‘suitable political proposition’ for the Zimbabwean masses is necessary. In fact, it was necessary as far back as 1980 right after independence. Sadly, no such a national dialogue was held.

This village idiot will give thumbs up to anyone who is making efforts to put together a national dialogue for this country. Zimbabwe needs two separate and distinct national dialogues: A national dialogue for “national healing” and a national dialogue for “a suitable political proposition” for the masses.

This village idiot talks nonsense frankly and thus his trade mark. Let the village idiot be frank about the present and current political proposition for Zimbabwean masses. It is unacceptable, inyala-marara-rubbish.

This is why this country needs an urgent national dialogue, not to “discuss political power sharing” as in the past experience that landed the masses with that useless “government of national unity” but for the nation to come to a consensus on what the suitable political proposition for the Zimbabwean masses should be.

To guide the national conversations on such a national dialogue we would need a “national framework for dialogue”. Such a framework should be clear what national questions concerning the governance of this country does the national dialogue seek to answer. In short let the Zimbabwean masses agree on the list of questions that the national dialogue seeks to respond to and find answers. Such national questions should form the main part of the framework for a national dialogue for this country, that is if one of the agendas of the national dialogue is to find a suitable political proposition for the Zimbabwean masses.

The village idiot would be more than excited if in that list of national questions for the national dialogue framework “three” questions for national dialogue are included. I have no space in this article to discuss and breakdown all the three questions as proposed by this village idiot, so I will only dwell on one of the three questions.

“Is Zimbabwe and its masses safe in the driving hands and leadership of its bush war fighters?” They fancy calling themselves “war veterans” and I am not sure were that was copied from given the nature of Zimbabwe’s liberation war where the biggest financiers and investors of that liberation war and struggle were ordinary Zimbabwean villagers. Even the ancestors of Zimbabwe through family and national spirit mediums were deeply involved in the composition of the Zimbabwean liberation struggle.

Even in the preamble of our Constitution it is put clearly that Zimbabwe does not have only one colonial resistance and liberation struggle. It has several of these, and yet those that got involved only in the last decade of the colonial resistance and struggle journey of this country now ring fence themselves as the only ones to be recognised and that their interests about Zimbabwe are more superior than all other interests.

It is for this reason that this village idiot wonders why one would create a class society of war veterans given such liberation war and struggle composition and background.

Is Zimbabwe safe in the hands and leadership of this self created class society from the wards level all the way to Senate, National Assembly and Central Government?

This is the biggest question for national dialogue if the nation seeks to find a suitable political proposition for the Zimbabwean masses.

The current political proposition in this country is only in the service and interests of this class society who think their contribution to the liberation struggle of this country is more superior than that of all other Zimbabweans since 1893.

There are many good reasons for putting this question on the national dialogue framework but two stick out for this village idiot. This village idiot likes the first five words that open the Preamble of our Constitution.

They go; “We the people of Zimbabwe”.This speaks to unity, collective, inclusive and equality of our desires as a people, yet this  special society and social class of liberators have put themselves above all the “we the people of Zimbabwe” making themselves more equal than others in that only those from their social class can lead Zimbabwe.

This political proposition arose in 2000 as a reaction to the rise of the opposition party the Movement for Democratic Change and has been sponsored by this social class of liberators to this day. Is this what “we the people of Zimbabwe” want for this nation? Let’s dialogue this question.

In the same Constitution  “we the people of Zimbabwe” list our founding values and principles and we state that we recognise the rights of the veterans of the liberation struggle. We need to unpack these rights in some national dialogue because the way the current political proposition stands shows that this social class has a different understanding of these rights and their role in the politics and governance of Zimbabwe where they even claim that they are the only ones who have a right to defending the freedoms and liberation legacy of this nation and their way is the only right way for all of us “the people of Zimbabwe”. Is this what “we the people of Zimbabwe want for this nation?” Let’s dialogue this questions.

If who ever and what ever national dialogue is not going to have conversations around this question, then this village idiot will note take any notice to any dialogue forum as it would just be about power sharing and trying to impress the world citizens were our politicians have fun as they go round begging for money in the name of Zimbabweans and having nothing to do with addressing critical issues that have dragged Zimbabwe backwards for so many years.

Then people can meet and dine on behalf of the suffering masses of Zimbabwe in the name of some national dialogue and life after such dialogue will remain the same for we the people of Zimbabwe, unaffordable and suffer continue.

Zimbabwe is for us all and not just the urban idiot with their social class of liberators.

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Govt punishes striking teachers 

Source: Govt punishes striking teachers – NewsDay Zimbabwe February 28, 2019 By Farai Matiashe Government has moved to deduct salaries of over 10 000 teachers who went on strike early this month. The Zimbabwe Teachers’ Association (Zimta) and the Progressive Teachers’ Union of Zimbabwe (PTUZ) defied the Apex Council and called for an industrial action, […]

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Source: Govt punishes striking teachers – NewsDay Zimbabwe February 28, 2019

By Farai Matiashe

Government has moved to deduct salaries of over 10 000 teachers who went on strike early this month.

The Zimbabwe Teachers’ Association (Zimta) and the Progressive Teachers’ Union of Zimbabwe (PTUZ) defied the Apex Council and called for an industrial action, which was heeded by 80% of their members.

In a statement yesterday, Public Service Commission (PSC) acting chairman, Ozias Hove said the government’s move was based on a no-pay, no-work principle.

“The PSC has noted isolated cases of abscondment by about 10 200 teachers for durations ranging from one to four days from February 5 to 8, 2019. The PSC would like to advise all who were absent from work without authority, that deductions from their leave days (of the offending individuals) using the principle of ‘no-work, no-pay’ will be effected,” he said.

Hove said the commission was treating these 10 200 as first offenders and a repeat of the same offence would attract a more severe punishment.

Hove said the PSC inspectorate and inspectors from the responsible ministry was to continue monitoring the situation in schools because there were some teachers around the country reporting for work, but not offering services to pupils.

“Those members reporting for work, but not providing services will be deemed to have been absent as they would not have rendered any service at all. The PSC inspectorate and inspectors from the Primary and Secondary Education ministry will continue to monitor attendance in all schools,” he said.

The striking teachers cited incapacitation and were demanding their salaries to be paid in United States dollars or, alternatively, $1 700 and improved remunerations.

But PTUZ secretary-general Raymond Majongwe said the action by the government was unacceptable because it was damaging the education system.

“This is totally unnecessary. Teachers are suffering and the government knows it, so why punish the victims? If they are not careful, our education system will suffer serious collateral damages. Teachers will resign and be bystanders. If our employer is serious, they must engage their workers and find a way to motivate them,” he said.

Majongwe dismissed the government’s claims that the Apex Council did not call for an industrial action.

“Apex Council issued a strike notice (in January), so, government cannot get into a defence mode to exonerate them (Apex Council) for what they did,” Majongwe said.

Zimta chief executive officer, Sifiso Ndlovu said there has not been any communication with the unions regarding the decision to dock teachers’ salaries.

“Nothing has been communicated to us regarding the issue. We are only seeing the statement, which is circulating. It is very unfortunate that the government has decided to take such a move,” he said, adding that they were going to engage the employer to understand why they were doing so and on what grounds.

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Mnangagwa meets Masisi over bailout

Source: Mnangagwa meets Masisi over bailout | Newsday (News) BY XOLISANI NCUBE President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s international re-engagement bid is set to bear fruits with the arrival of his Botswana counterpart, Mokgweetsi Masisi, with the two leaders expected to lead talks for a possible bailout of $500 million and one billion pula to Zimbabwe. Masisi landed […]

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Source: Mnangagwa meets Masisi over bailout | Newsday (News)

BY XOLISANI NCUBE

President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s international re-engagement bid is set to bear fruits with the arrival of his Botswana counterpart, Mokgweetsi Masisi, with the two leaders expected to lead talks for a possible bailout of $500 million and one billion pula to Zimbabwe.

Masisi landed in Harare yesterday evening and was welcomed at Robert Gabriel Mugabe International Airport by Mnangagwa and his two Vice-Presidents Constantino Chiwenga and Kembo Mohadi.

Yesterday evening, Masisi’s office denied that it had promised a bailout to the Mnangagwa administration, but said they are in talks under a bi-national commission on issues “mutually beneficial to the peoples of the two countries”.

Mnangagwa last night hosted a State banquet in honour of the visiting Botswana leader. The two leaders will today jointly hold the inaugural Zimbabwe-Botswana Bi-National Commission, conference.

Secretary for Foreign Affairs, James Manzou said at least eight bilateral agreements would be signed today.

“As we have said already, eight memoranda of understanding and agreements, covering political and diplomatic, economic, social (and) defence and security sectors will be signed during this session,” Manzou said.

Yesterday, a meeting of Foreign Affairs and International Trade ministers was held in Harare ahead of the conference. Relations between Harare and Gaborone were frosty for close to a decade when Botswana’s ex-President Ian Khama, who stepped down in 2018, routinely disapproved of former President Robert Mugabe being in power for too long.

A military coup in 2017 forced Mugabe to resign, ending his 37-year rule.

The loan will consist of $500 million for Zimbabwe’s diamond industry and a further one billion pula fund for private companies.

The visit by Masisi comes as South African leader Cyril Ramaphosa is also set to visit Harare next month.

The leaders of both countries have recently called for Western sanctions, still in force on some Zimbabwean leaders and institutions, to be lifted.

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Warrant of arrest for Zanu PF MP

Source: Warrant of arrest for Zanu PF MP | Newsday (News) By Simbarashe Sithole Guruve magistrate Shingirai Mutiro yesterday issued a warrant of arrest for Guruve South legislator, Patrick Dutiro (Zanu PF) and his party community chairperson, Roti Nelson Moyana (66) after the two failed to turn up to answer to contempt of court charges. […]

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Source: Warrant of arrest for Zanu PF MP | Newsday (News)

By Simbarashe Sithole

Guruve magistrate Shingirai Mutiro yesterday issued a warrant of arrest for Guruve South legislator, Patrick Dutiro (Zanu PF) and his party community chairperson, Roti Nelson Moyana (66) after the two failed to turn up to answer to contempt of court charges.

The State alleges that on January 15 last year, Dutiro (50) and Moyana went to Norowe Farm, where the messenger of court, Alleta Mutseta was evicting illegal settlers in the presence of Thompson Maguduru and Jabulani Ncube.

On their arrival, the Zanu PF officials told the illegal settlers that the messenger of court was executing a false eviction order.

He allegedly told the settlers to remain at the farm and not to obey the instruction to vacate the farm.

Fearing for her life, Mutseta aborted the eviction. Albert Mazhindu represented the State.

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