Mixed reactions to Mugabe death 

Source: Mixed reactions to Mugabe death – NewsDay Zimbabwe September 7, 2019 BY EVERSON MUSHAVA/FARAI MATIASHE ZIMBABWEANS and political leaders from across the globe yesterday expressed mixed reactions to news of the death of former President Robert Mugabe, with some describing him as a judicious leader while others labelled him one of Africa’s worst dictators […]

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Source: Mixed reactions to Mugabe death – NewsDay Zimbabwe September 7, 2019

BY EVERSON MUSHAVA/FARAI MATIASHE

ZIMBABWEANS and political leaders from across the globe yesterday expressed mixed reactions to news of the death of former President Robert Mugabe, with some describing him as a judicious leader while others labelled him one of Africa’s worst dictators who overstayed in power and eventually ruined his legacy.

Last night, President Emmerson Mnangagwa declared Mugabe a national hero and said all the coming days would be set aside for mourning until the 95-year-old former Statesman is laid to rest.

Mugabe died yesterday morning at the age of 95 after being admitted at Gleneagles Hospital in Singapore in April
this year.

Friends and foes immediately took to social media to express their views, with some analysts saying his style of
leadership spanning 37 years was loved and hated in equal measure.

Mugabe was toppled in a military coup at the height of the ruling Zanu PF party’s factional fights in November
2017 and immediately succeeded by his then deputy, Mnangagwa, following a nasty fallout.

Mnangagwa broke the news of his political mentor’s death in a tweet, describing Mugabe as a liberation war icon
and pan-Africanist who sacrificed all for the emancipation of Zimbabweans.

“Cde Mugabe was an icon of liberation, a pan-Africanist who dedicated his life to the emancipation and
empowerment of his people. His contribution to the history of our nation and continent will never be forgotten.
May his soul rest in eternal peace,” Mnangagwa said on Twitter before cutting short his business engagements at
the World Economic Forum in Cape Town, South Africa, to come back home and arrange for the repatriation of
Mugabe’s remains.

Mugabe, who, during his tenure attracted scorn from the opposition after denying national hero status to several
deserving liberation war heavyweights, is reported to have told close family members that he wished to be buried
at his rural home in Zvimba, Mashonaland West province.

Although Mnangagwa is yet to publicly respond to the proposal, top Zanu PF sources said government was most
likely to override Mugabe’s deathbed wish and bury him at the national shrine, where his first wife, Sally, was
laid to rest in 1992.

National Peace and Reconciliation Commission (NPRC) chairperson retired Justice Selo Maselo Nare said Mugabe
would be remembered for extending an olive branch to his white oppressors at independence in 1980.

Justice Nare added that Mugabe’s peace and reconciliation efforts brought once warring parties Zanu and PF Zapu
together when he and then Zapu leader, the late Joshua Nkomo signed the Unity Agreement on December 22, 1987,
allowing citizens to once again taste peace after the regrettable Gukurahundi violence in Matabeleland and
Midlands provinces.

“At a time the country was at a crossroads, Cde Mugabe again signed the Global Political Agreement with the late
MDC-T leader Morgan Tsvangirai to pave way for the Government of National Unity. It is no coincidence that the
constitutional and legislative processes to establish and operationalise NPRC began during his tenure as
President,” Justice Nare said.

“The NPRC extends its heartfelt condolences to the Mugabe family, President Emmerson Mnangagwa and the
government of the Republic of Zimbabwe for the sad (and) untimely departure of the liberation icon and Pan-
Africanist.”

Most loathed at home, Mugabe was revered in the Sadc region as an iconic leader.

Many African leaders described Mugabe as a liberation legend, with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta declaring
three days of mourning the former Zanu PF leader.

Neighbouring South Africa’s ruling African National Congress (ANC) party hailed Mugabe for exhibiting principled
leadership, saying Africa was poorer without him.
ANC secretary-general Ace Magashule said Mugabe’s life epitomised the “new African” who, having shrugged off the
colonial yoke, strived to ensure his country took its place among the community of nations, firmly in charge of
its own destiny.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa also acknowledged the role Mugabe played in advancing regional
solidarity, integration and development through Zimbabwe’s participation in the Southern African Development
Community.

Mugabe’s decision to invest in his country’s education helped the nation even after the collapse of its economy, South Africa’s opposition United Democratic Movement leader Bantu Holomisa said in a statement.

But Democratic Alliance spokesperson Solly Malatsi said Mugabe would be remembered for his conflicting legacy as
a liberator towards independence and an oppressor of the democratic values he once fought for.

Britain, Zimbabwe’s former colonial master, said Zimbabweans had “suffered for too long” under Mugabe.

“We express our condolences to those who mourn Robert Mugabe’s death. However, Zimbabweans suffered for too long
as a result of Mugabe’s autocratic role,” the British Foreign ministry said in a statement.

The European Union said it would continue to stand with Zimbabwe and its people to secure the democratic future
of the country.

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin said: “Many important dates in Zimbabwe’s modern history are tied to the name of Robert Mugabe. He made a great personal contribution to the battle for your country’s independence, to the
building of Zimbabwean State institutions.”

GraÇa Machel, widow of the late Mozambican leader Samora Machel and South African President Nelson Mandela, said Mugabe was like a brother to her.

“Mugabe was my brother because before he came back in Zimbabwe in 1980, he was in Mozambique. I knew him very
well and when my husband, the former President of Mozambique Samora Machel, was killed, I ran and came to this
country to Mugabe because I could not sleep,” she said in Harare during a Zimbabwe Council of Churches Women’s
Dialogue platform.

“When the former First Lady, the late Sally Mugabe passed away, I also came to Zimbabwe to mourn with him
because he was my brother. But there is something wrong with leaders sitting in power for too long. As a result,
for the younger generation, they cannot remember that he contributed immensely for the liberation of this
country.”

Exiled former Cabinet minister in Mugabe’s government Jonathan Moyo tweeted: “It’s sad you have gone at the most
trying time for Zimbabwe. Truth-telling will one day reveal how you fought your regime’s enforcers to find each
other with (Joshua) Nkomo in 1987 and (Morgan) Tsvangirai in 2009; and why besides yourself, only (Nelson)
Chamisa got your vote for the presidency!”

Chamisa said even though his party differed politically with the late former President during his reign, he
recognised the positive contributions Mugabe made as the country’s founding President.

“There’s so much to say for a life of 95 years and national leadership spanning over 37 years, but in the true
spirit of Ubuntu, we would like to give this moment to mourning, but there will be time for greater reflection,”
the opposition MDC leader said yesterday.

MDC national secretary for elections Jacob Mafume said Mugabe ruined his legacy by clinging to power against all
odds.

“A lesson learnt is not to overstay in power, a lesson that one can be many things to different people. Hated
and loved in equal measure. A ruined country remains, he died far from it,” Mafume said.

Another MDC official, David Coltart, said Mugabe made immense contribution to the country’s education system,
but also had a dark side whose negative legacy will live on and haunt Zimbabweans for decades to come.
Youth Forum Zimbabwe director Ashton Bumhira blamed Mugabe for the economic malaise the southern African nation is facing.

“For my generation, Mr Robert Mugabe should be remembered for what he was to us. He was a dictator. He was
ruthless. He is the author of the current economic and political challenges we’re facing as a nation,” he said.

“If it was not the coup, Mr Mugabe wanted to rule from the grave. The current Zanu PF leadership is the epitome
of his legacy.”

An entrepreneur in Mbare, the slums of Harare, Albert Chibanda (29), described Mugabe as an iconic leader who
empowered the youths through various initiatives.

“It is sad to hear that Mugabe has passed on. To us the youths, he empowered us through his indigenisation and
empowerment programmes. He was very influential. During his times, he supported us to establish businesses which
are enabling us to put food on the table for our families today,” he said.

Petunia Mugadza (25), a vendor in the capital, said Mugabe, through his economic policies, ensured that
Zimbabweans would not suffer.

“I wish if he had lived longer than this. During his days, we did not suffer like we are doing now,” she said.

Opposition New Patriotic Front leader Tendai Peter Munyanduri also said “the world is now poorer without him and his contributions. He tried his best while on earth!”

Additional reporting by international news agencies

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International Treaties Bill gazetted

Source: International Treaties Bill gazetted | Herald (Africa) Fidelis Munyoro Chief Court Reporter Government has gazetted the International Treaties Bill, which seeks to provide uniform procedure for the approval of international treaties and subsequent ratification by the President.  The Bill was published in a Government gazette yesterday. It will also provide a mechanism for the […]

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Source: International Treaties Bill gazetted | Herald (Africa)

Fidelis Munyoro Chief Court Reporter
Government has gazetted the International Treaties Bill, which seeks to provide uniform procedure for the approval of international treaties and subsequent ratification by the President.  The Bill was published in a Government gazette yesterday.

It will also provide a mechanism for the publication or notification of such treaties.

This is aimed to ensure international treaties, including those having far-reaching consequences on the country’s domestic laws, are concluded only after the due notification of Parliament and the public.

The preamble to the Bill points to the re-alignment of the law on treaties with the national supreme law.

The Constitution provides that most international treaties require the approval of Parliament except those that include peace treaties, which are made within the prerogative powers in the sphere of international relations, among others.

In terms of clause 4 of the Bill, the Foreign Affairs Ministry will be the principal custodian and national depositary of all international treaties.

“It also obliges the ministry to open and maintain an official archive of all international treaties currently in force, access to which will be afforded to any interested person subject to such conditions, including the payment of any for access to the archive or the provision of authenticated copies of any international treaty,” reads the Bill.

The Bill provides for the appointment and functions of the Public Agreements Advisory Committee (PAAC), whose core function will be to consider all proposed international treaties and make appropriate recommendations regarding their negotiation, drafting and approval by the executive and legislature.

Though the committee already exists, clause 5 of the Bill will establish it on a statutory footing.

The most striking feature is clause 10, which obliges the court to take judicial notice of certain matters in connection with international treaties published in terms of the Bill.

However, the non-publication of an international treaty concluded before the date of commencement of this Bill, or the non-compliance with certain formalities preliminary to approval and ratification of an international treaty, does not invalidate that treaty.

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International buyers troop in for Sanganai/Hlanganani

Source: International buyers troop in for Sanganai/Hlanganani | Newsday (News) BY WINSTONE ANTONIO INTERNATIONAL buyers have started arriving for the 12th edition of Sanganai/Hlanganani World Tourism Expo which is set to be held at the Zimbabwe International Trade Fair (ZITF) in Bulawayo from September 12 to 14. Zimbabwe Tourism Authority spokesperson Godfrey Koti said buyers […]

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Source: International buyers troop in for Sanganai/Hlanganani | Newsday (News)

BY WINSTONE ANTONIO

INTERNATIONAL buyers have started arriving for the 12th edition of Sanganai/Hlanganani World Tourism Expo which is set to be held at the Zimbabwe International Trade Fair (ZITF) in Bulawayo from September 12 to 14.

Zimbabwe Tourism Authority spokesperson Godfrey Koti said buyers would embark on pre-Sanganai/Hlanganani tours in areas such as Nyanga, Gonarezhou and the Victoria Falls.

“The pre and post-tours will cover the whole of Zimbabwe and will give the buyers first-hand experience of the
tourist destinations and activities available for visitors to Zimbabwe,” he said.

ZTA signed a memorandum of understanding with Ethiopian Airlines to ferry international visitors to the expo and
position Zimbabwe as a destination of choice.

“We envisage that this partnership will be extended to tourists visiting Zimbabwe and not just for the tourism
expo, but throughout the year,” he said.

Speaking on the sidelines of the signing ceremony, Ethiopian Airlines country manager Wogayehu Terefe said the
airline was already enjoying frequent flights into Zimbabwe.

“Ethiopian Airlines has offered heavily discounted fares for both business and economy class to international
buyers, exhibitors and media travelling to Zimbabwe for the tourism expo,” she said.

“Ethiopian Airlines operates daily flights into Harare and flies five times a week to Victoria Falls since 2017.
Ethiopia is one of the biggest connection hubs in Africa, linking over 120 destinations in the world.”

Meanwhile, Africa Conservation Travel has also joined hands with ZTA to bring world record adventurer and
conservationist Holly Budge as part of the A-list of luminaries set to grace the expo.

Budge has two world records under her belt, including being the first woman to skydive Mount Everest and race
semi-wild horses 1 000km across Mongolia in nine days.

Her other achievements include summiting Mount Everest, leading an expedition on the technical mountain, Ama
Dablam, in Nepal and making a successful first ascent in the Altai Mountains. Africa Conservation Travel
director Shelley Cox applauded the expo organisers for including the women in tourism capacity-building workshop
on its programme, saying it enhances the development and rise of women in the tourism industry. Cox said
Sanganai/Hlanganani World Tourism Expo presents a perfect opportunity for tourism trade promotion as it enables
tourism players to connect with both the international and regional buyers.

“As the annual Sanganai World Tourism Expo approaches, we at Africa Conservation Travel are looking forward to
connecting with the international and regional buyers and media who will be attending to showcase all that
Zimbabwe has to offer from a tourism and conservation perspective,” she said.

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Bob: As divisive in death as he was in life

Source: Bob: As divisive in death as he was in life | Newsday (News) ROGER SOUTHALL ROBERT Mugabe, the former President of Zimbabwe, has died. Mugabe was 95, and had been struggling with ill health for some time. The country’s current President Emmerson Mnangagwa announced Mugabe’s death on Twitter yesterday. “@edmnangagwa: It is with the […]

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Source: Bob: As divisive in death as he was in life | Newsday (News)

ROGER SOUTHALL

ROBERT Mugabe, the former President of Zimbabwe, has died.

Mugabe was 95, and had been struggling with ill health for some time. The country’s current President Emmerson Mnangagwa announced Mugabe’s death on Twitter yesterday.

“@edmnangagwa: It is with the utmost sadness that I announce the passing on of Zimbabwe’s founding father and
former President, Cde Robert Mugabe (1/2)”

The responses to Mnangagwa’s announcement were immediate and widely varied. Some hailed Mugabe as a liberation
hero. Others dismissed him as a “monster”. This suggests that Mugabe will be as divisive a figure in death as he
was in life.

The official mantra of the Zimbabwe government and its ruling Zanu PF party will emphasise his leadership of the
struggle to overthrow Ian Smith’s racist settler regime in what was then Rhodesia.

It will also extol his subsequent championing of the seizure of white-owned farms and the return of land into
African hands.

In contrast, critics will highlight how — after initially preaching racial reconciliation after the liberation
war in December 1979 — Mugabe threw away the promise of the early independence years.

He did this in several ways, among them a brutal clampdown on political opposition in Matabeleland in the 1980s,
and Zanu PF’s systematic rigging of elections to keep he and his cronies in power.

They’ll also mention the massive corruption over which he presided, and the economy’s disastrous downward plunge
during his presidency.

Inevitably, the focus will primarily be on his domestic record. Yet many of those who will sing his praises as a
hero of African nationalism will be from elsewhere on the continent.

So where should we place Mugabe among the pantheon of African nationalists who led their countries to independence?

Slide into despotism

Most African countries have been independent of colonial rule for half a century or more.

The early African nationalist leaders were often regarded as gods at independence. Yet they very quickly came to
be perceived as having feet of very heavy clay.

Nationalist leaders symbolised African freedom and liberation. But few were to prove genuinely tolerant of
democracy and diversity.

One party rule, nominally in the name of “the people”, became widespread.

In some cases, it was linked to interesting experiments in one-party democracy, as seen in Tanzania under Julius
Nyerere and Zambia under Kenneth Kaunda.

Even in these cases, intolerance and authoritarianism eventually encroached. Often, party rule was succeeded by
military coups.

In Zimbabwe’s case, Mugabe proved unable to shift the country, as he had wished, to one-partyism.

However, this did not prevent Zanu PF becoming increasingly intolerant over the years in response to both
economic crisis and rising opposition. Successive elections were shamelessly perverted.

When, despite this, Zanu PF lost control of Parliament in 2008, it responded by rigging the presidential election in a campaign of unforgivable brutality.

Under Mugabe, the potential for democracy was snuffed out by a brutal despotism.

A wasted inheritance

Whether the economic policies they pursued were ostensibly capitalist or socialist, the early African nationalist leaders presided over rapid economic decline, following an initial period of relative prosperity
after independence.
In retrospect, it’s widely recognised that the challenges they faced were immense.

Most post-colonial economies were underdeveloped and depended upon the export of a small number of agricultural or mineral commodities.

From the 1970s, growth was crowded out by the International Monetary Fund demanding that mounting debts be
surmounted through the pursuit of structural adjustment programmes.

This hindered spending on infrastructure as well as social services and education and swelled political
discontent.

In contrast, Mugabe inherited a viable, relatively broad-based economy that included substantial industrial and
prosperous commercial agricultural sectors.

Even though these were largely white controlled, there was far greater potential for development than in most
other post-colonial African countries.

But, through massive corruption and mismanagement, his government threw that potential away.

He also presided over a disastrous downward spiral of the economy, which saw both industry and commercial agriculture collapse.

The economy has never recovered and remains in a state of acute and persistent crisis today.

Reputation

On the political front, the rule of some leaders — like Milton Obote in Uganda and Siad Barre in Somalia — created so much conflict that coups and crises drove their countries into civil war.

Zimbabwe under Mugabe was spared this fate — but perhaps only because the political opposition in Matabeleland in the 1980s was so brutalised after up to 20 000 people were killed, that they shrank from more conflict.

Peace, then, was merely the absence of outright war.

Some leaders, notably Ghana’s Kwame Nkrumah and Julius Nyerere in Tanzania, are still revered for their commitments to national independence and African unity.

This is despite the fact that, domestically, their records were marked by failure.

By 1966, when Nkrumah was displaced by a military coup, his one-party rule had become politically corrupt and repressive.

Despite this, Nyerere always retained his reputation for personal integrity and commitment to African development.

Both Nkrumah’s and Nyerere’s ideas continue to inspire younger generations of political activists, while other post-independence leaders’ names are largely forgotten.

Will Mugabe be similarly feted by later generations? Will the enormous flaws of his rule be forgotten amid celebrations of his unique role in the liberation of southern Africa as a whole?

A Greek tragedy

The problem for pan-Africanist historians who rush to praise Mugabe is that they will need to repudiate the contrary view of the millions of Zimbabweans who have suffered under his rule or have fled the country to escape it.

He contributed no political ideas that have lasted. He inherited the benefits as well as the costs of settler rule but reduced his country to penury.

He destroyed the best of its institutional inheritance, notably an efficient civil service, which could have been put to good use for all.

The cynics would say that the reputation of Patrice Lumumba, as an African revolutionary and fighter for Congolese unity has lasted because he was assassinated in 1961.

In other words, he had the historical good fortune to die young, without the burden of having made major and grievous mistakes.

In contrast, there are many who would say that Mugabe simply lived too long, and his life was one of Greek tragedy: his early promise and virtue marked him out as popular hero, but he died a monster whom history will condemn.

Roger Southall is a professor of sociology, University of the Witwatersrand

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Trigger-happy policeman gets 7 year jail sentence after shooting suspect

A 28-YEAR-OLD police officer has been sentenced to seven years in prison for shooting a suspect on the leg. The victim, who is allegedly facing an attempted murder charge, is now disabled after his leg was amputated to save his life. Tatenda Manyaira, …

A 28-YEAR-OLD police officer has been sentenced to seven years in prison for shooting a suspect on the leg. The victim, who is allegedly facing an attempted murder charge, is now disabled after his leg was amputated to save his life. Tatenda Manyaira, who is stationed at ZRP Charandura, appeared yesterday before Gweru Regional Magistrate […]

JUST IN: 2 Zanu PF heavyweights barred from attending former President Mugabe’s funeral (SEE NAMES)

Robert Mugabe’s family has requested that two senior Zanu PF officials do not attend his funeral, ZimLive understands. Zanu PF chairperson and defence minister Oppah Muchinguri and the party’s political commissar and deputy defence minister…

Robert Mugabe’s family has requested that two senior Zanu PF officials do not attend his funeral, ZimLive understands. Zanu PF chairperson and defence minister Oppah Muchinguri and the party’s political commissar and deputy defence minister Victor Matemadanda are not welcome at the former leader’s funeral. This emerged during an emotional family meeting held at Kutama […]