Introduction of Zimdollar to sink economy, say analysts

Source: Introduction of Zimdollar to sink economy, say analysts – The Zimbabwe Independent June 28, 2019 Losing value … Bond notes THE decision by government this week to abolish the multi-currency regime and re-introduce the Zimbabwean dollar as the sole legal tender could be catastrophic as the local currency’s value may tumble against major currencies, […]

The post Introduction of Zimdollar to sink economy, say analysts appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

Source: Introduction of Zimdollar to sink economy, say analysts – The Zimbabwe Independent June 28, 2019

bond-notes.jpg

Losing value … Bond notes

THE decision by government this week to abolish the multi-currency regime and re-introduce the Zimbabwean dollar as the sole legal tender could be catastrophic as the local currency’s value may tumble against major currencies, plunging the country into hyperinflation.

BY TINASHE KAIRIZA

While some captains of industry and analysts welcomed the move, others were sceptical and critical.

The Zimdollar, which was initially abandoned in 2009 after being ravaged by severe hyperinflation, this week became the country’s sole currency through Statutory Instrument (SI) 142 of 2019, known as the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe RBZ (Legal Tender) Regulations.

In 2016, government introduced the bond currency to the basket of currencies, a fiat currency which was ostensibly meant to incentivise exporting firms.

“These regulations may be cited as the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ) Legal Tender Regulations 2019. Subject to Section 3, with effect from 24th June 2019, the British pound, United States dollar, South African rand, Botswana pula and any other foreign currency whatsoever shall no longer be legal tender alongside the Zimbabwe dollar in any transactions in Zimbabwe,” part of the SI said.

“Accordingly, the Zimbabwean dollar shall, with effect from the 24 June, 2019, but subject to Section 3, be the sole legal tender in Zimbabwe in all transactions.”

The rationale to abandon the multi-currency system, which brought relative stability on the market when it was introduced in 2009, as explained by Finance minister Mthuli Ncube this week, is to restore the central bank’s monetary authority, thereby containing spiralling commodity prices and inflation.

“What we are trying to do is restore full monetary policy where the central bank can conduct monetary policy using the array of tools that are necessary for managing monetary policy such as interest rates, use of a monetary policy committee to govern things like targeting money balances or even targeting inflation,” Ncube said.

“Basically, the multi-currency regime, which had by the way become a mono-currency in favour of the US dollar, was favouring those with access to US dollars; those with access to US dollars were facing no change in inflation at all for the last three years.”

However, the basis for adopting a basket of currencies a decade ago was supported by the need to stabilise Zimbabwe’s fragile economy in the absence of macro-economic fundamentals which resulted in the decimation of the local dollar, amid spiralling inflation which peaked to 89,7 sextillion percent on November 14, 2008.

Now, a decade later Zimbabwe — still deep in the throes of an intractable economic crisis — is reeling from unstable macro-economic fundamentals not conducive for the return of the local dollar. The local unit, a combination of electronic balances, bond coins and notes already in circulation, has failed to hold its own against major currencies, particularly the ever firming United States dollar.

Official figures show that inflation has risen to 97,8%, though renowned US economist Steve Hanke forecasts it to be hovering at more than 300%. Ironically, Treasury projects inflation to recede below 14% by year-end, tamed as it says, by the range of austerity measures currently being implemented.

With Zimbabwe’s agriculture sector, which used to be the mainstay of the economy, ruined by former president Robert Mugabe’s chaotic land reform programme of 2000, experts say the southern African country’s decision to abandon the multi-currency system, while upholding the local dollar as the sole legal tender could lead to an all too familiar path of hyperinflation.

Ditching the basket of currencies, analysts say, will exert inflationary pressures on the local currency, unless backed by foreign currency, gold reserves and exports.

In February, government liberalised the exchange rate, resulting in the RTGS dollar tumbling in value against the US dollar and other currencies. It is now pegged at 6,3 to the US dollar on the interbank market, while on the parallel market it has soared to 13.

Critics of the return of the Zimbabwean dollar, which is now the monetary unit effectively in circulation, say that it is imperative to ensure macro-economic stability and restore public confidence before the country can start trading with its local currency. They say the real value of a currency lies in the public confidence besides its intrinsic and market value.

But, with memories of Zimbabwe’s hyperinflation era still fresh in their memories, confidence appears to have waned as the local unit continues to tumble against currencies of choice, necessitating government intervention.
Coupled with that, Zimbabwe is also struggling to extinguish an estimated US$20 billion debt stock, a situation which has restricted the country from unlocking fresh lines of credit perceived to be key towards mending the sbattered economy.

Bindura University commerce lecturer Felix Chari said in the absence of structural economic reforms, Treasury’s decision to abandon the multi-currency regime would stoke inflationary pressures, and render the local unit worthless.

“It was premature to reintroduce the local currency in the absence of sound macro-economic fundamentals required to stabilise the economy. The Zimbabwean dollar is vulnerable to inflation due to low levels of productivity and exports. Inflation will continue to rise as the Zimbabwean dollar devalues,” Chari contends.

Former finance minister Tendai Biti, who served in the inclusive government that saw Zimbabwe adopting dollarisation as an official currency policy, said the scrapping of the multi-currency regime would spark civil unrest, with retail shops running dry and the local unit depreciating.

“It is insanity, it is total madness. You cannot introduce a new currency when the macro-economic fundamentals are not there. We have a crisis of confidence, a crisis of legitimacy,” Biti said.

“You are going to see a massive shortage of goods in the supermarkets. You are going to see disinvestment in the country. There will be massive externalisation. You will see massive civil unrest. It is a major security threat.”

However, other analysts say the Zimdollar’s return was necessary even in these conditions.

The post Introduction of Zimdollar to sink economy, say analysts appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

New Zim dollar triggers horror memories of hyper-inflation

Source: New Zim dollar triggers horror memories of hyper-inflation – The Citizen although described as a ‘knee-jerk’ policy introduced in ‘the dead of night’, the exchange rate improvement of 11 Zim dollars to one US dollar this week (from 14 earlier this month) is perhaps an early sign that the measures are working. Image: Twitter/@hallaboutafrica […]

The post New Zim dollar triggers horror memories of hyper-inflation appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

Source: New Zim dollar triggers horror memories of hyper-inflation – The Citizen

lthough described as a ‘knee-jerk’ policy introduced in ‘the dead of night’, the exchange rate improvement of 11 Zim dollars to one US dollar this week (from 14 earlier this month) is perhaps an early sign that the measures are working. Image: Twitter/@hallaboutafrica

although described as a ‘knee-jerk’ policy introduced in ‘the dead of night’, the exchange rate improvement of 11 Zim dollars to one US dollar this week (from 14 earlier this month) is perhaps an early sign that the measures are working. Image: Twitter/@hallaboutafrica

The resurgence of inflation to 100% – though far less frightening than had been the case prior to 2008 – makes it increasingly difficult for families to survive.

Zimbabwe banned the use of foreign currencies this week, demanding that businesses accept only local currency.

This has triggered fears of a return to Robert Mugabe-era inflation, which peaked at over a million percent. That was brought to a sudden end in 2013 when the country allowed trading in foreign currencies, and inflation dropped virtually overnight to under 10%. The decision to allow trade in US dollars, South African rands and Botswana pula was widely credited for stabilising the country’s shambolic economy. The collapse was primarily driven by a massive fiscal deficit and the reckless printing of money by the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ).

Yesterday, the so-called Real Time Gross Settlement (RTGS) dollar strengthened to 11 to the US dollar from a low of 14 earlier in the week, according to some reports. Economist Eddie Cross, one of the architects of the new financial regulations and a former Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) parliamentarian, says the new measures are aimed at reducing the RTGS dollar to around four to the US dollar. That should also bring inflation down from its current level of about 100%.

It was this spiralling inflation, and the inability of ordinary Zimbabweans to survive in a country where hard currency became the preferred legal tender, that prompted the sudden move. Most Zimbabweans struggled to lay their hands on US dollars and rands.

Several measures were announced: the formation of a monetary policy committee similar to that of the SA Reserve Bank to make decisions on interest rates; an increase in short-term lending rates from 17% to 50%; and an increase in forex for trade on the inter-bank market.

Curbing forex opportunists

One of the purposes of these measures is to reduce the massive arbitrage opportunities available to those with access to foreign currency. Because the price of fuel is controlled at Z$3.50 a litre by the state, more than 2 000 heavy duty fuel trucks enter Zimbabwe every day to transit the country to states to the north and east, using the low fuel prices to fill their tanks.

It is reckoned that 2-3 million litres of diesel is being shipped out of Zimbabwe each day because of this pricing gap.

Fuel can be purchased in Zimbabwe for the equivalent of US$0.20 a litre and sold in Botswana for the equivalent of US$1.30 a litre – an easy path to quick riches for thousands of truck owners.

“Many people were borrowing local currency at 17% so they could engage in these arbitrage opportunities, but this had the effect of driving up prices for everybody else,” says Cross. “By hiking short-term interest rates to 50%, this makes it far less attractive for arbitrage. This should result in lower inflation across the board over the next few months. I think these measures are a step in the right direction, and we should see the parallel market rates for the RTGS dollar continue to strengthen.”

In February this year finance minister Mthuli Ncube instructed the RBZ to set up an inter-bank market for forex. The reserve bank resisted the instruction until President Emmerson Mnangagwa stepped in and insisted that the bank adhere to the Short Term Stabilisation Programme that had been adopted in 2018.

Tax threshold may be raised to offset the effects

The resurgence of inflation to 100% – though far less frightening than had been the case prior to 2008 – makes it increasingly difficult for families to survive. One of the measures being considered is to raise the threshold for paying income tax from RTGS$500 to RTGS$2 000, which would compensate for the effects of inflation.

Despite the rise in inflation in recent months, Zimbabwe has accumulated forex reserves of about US$1 billion and a fiscal surplus of US$2 billion.

Companies are required to remit 55% of forex earnings to the RBZ, amounting to about US$3 billion a year. Half of these retentions will now be made available on the inter-bank market as part of the package of stabilisation measures.

The RTGS was de-linked from the US dollar in September 2018, after which the exchange rate fell from RTGS$4:US$1 to 14:1 earlier this month. The improvement this week to 11:1 is perhaps an early sign that the measures are working.

‘A plan to hoover up forex’ from business

Other Zimbabweans are not so convinced. James Chidakwa, an opposition MDC member of parliament, says there are suspicions that this is a plan by the RBZ to hoover up all the forex from businesses.

“It will all end in tears for the rest of the people,” he says. “Not so long ago Ncube was asked what we should do about traders who ask for US dollars. His response was that it was perfectly legal for them to do so because we’re in a multi-currency economy.

“We have a two-headed beast running the country. How do businesses price their goods and services let alone replenish their goods?

“Another round of price madness has effectively been promoted. As MPs we are sandbagged with these people [those who run the country’s finances]. Ncube does not know what he is doing. This also reflects badly on the president’s judgement, by hiring someone who failed to run a bank [Ncube was chief economist and vice president of the African Development Bank] to turn around a failed state’s economy.”

The MDC yesterday said the new measures amount to the reintroduction of the dreaded Zim dollar, without addressing the economic fundamentals to support the local currency.

‘Nation ambushed’

“Despite government’s promise that it would introduce a new Zimbabwe currency in the next nine months while it addresses the fundamentals, the regime today just ambushed the nation and reintroduced the Zimbabwean dollar as the only legal tender in local transactions,” said Luke Tamborinyoka, MDC deputy national spokesperson.

“This means that the multi-currency regime, which provided some modicum of decency and predictability, has been thrown out of the window in favour of the volatile local currency that is not backed by adequate gold and foreign currency reserves.”

The trust and confidence that are vital to public willingness to transact in a new currency are not present.

“It remains to be seen how the market will respond to the madness, but the knee-jerk monetary policy introduced in the dead of the night is reminiscent of the rushed decisions of this regime,” said Tamborinyoka.

“The fuel price increases announced by Mnangagwa himself in the dead of night and that caused a furore in the country’s economy are a case in point.”

The post New Zim dollar triggers horror memories of hyper-inflation appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

Massive conservancy development blocked as police officers continue to violate a 2007 court order 

An initiative to set up a massive wildlife conservancy and historical tourism venture in Zimbabwe that would benefit the local community, as well as contributing to the revival of tourism and the economy by attracting international tourists, is on hold. Source: Massive conservancy development blocked as police officers continue to violate a 2007 court order […]

The post Massive conservancy development blocked as police officers continue to violate a 2007 court order  appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

An initiative to set up a massive wildlife conservancy and historical tourism venture in Zimbabwe that would benefit the local community, as well as contributing to the revival of tourism and the economy by attracting international tourists, is on hold.

Source: Massive conservancy development blocked as police officers continue to violate a 2007 court order – The Zimbabwean


During a recent visit to Zimbabwe, Dave Joubert managed to force his way onto his farm, which has been occupied by members of the Zimbabwe Republic Police since they invaded it in 2007, to survey the damage. This photo is an example of the total destruction of his entire agricultural enterprise on Portwe Estate in Matabeleland North province.

The combined farm and safari operation which is integral to the project and would generate vital foreign currency, continues to be illegally occupied by members of the Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) who took it over by force in July 2007.

Their ongoing occupation is in flagrant disregard of a confirmed court order of September 2007 compelling them to vacate the farm and return it to its lawful owner, a high profile Matabeleland farmer of approximately 50 years, and owner of Portwe Estate since 1982.

The failure of the government to remove the police from Joubert’s Portwe Estate and Bembesi conservancy, which are located in the Bubi district of Matabeleland North province, demonstrates that Zimbabwe is not “open for business”, as President Mnangagwa claims.

Campaign to apply 2007 court order

“With the support of Chief Nhlanhla Felix Ndiweni, the Paramount Chief of our neighbours, the Ndebele people with whom we’ve worked closely for years, we are now embarking on a campaign to apply the 2007 court order and regain our farm and conservancy project,” said Joubert.

According to the court order, the police have to vacate the property, as well as all of the buildings, and return all moveable property. All damaged property must be restored to its condition prior to the invasion. Virtually all agricultural equipment seized is now in a derelict state. The ZRP’s attempts to conduct basic cropping programmes have been a dismal failure.

Since January 2018, encouraged by the statements by government, Joubert has adopted a conciliatory approach to the situation, with the hope of creating a “win-win” solution which will enable agricultural production to resume and to pave the way for the planning and implementation of the joint venture project.

While on the face of it the initiative appeared to be well received, Joubert said there are clearly political interferences and policy anomalies which make progress impossible.

“Even entry to the farm or an audit of property taken by the ZRP at the invasion has been frustrated and blocked by senior officers operating from the Hwange district in northwestern Zimbabwe,” he explained.

The joint venture conservancy was initially the brainchild of Joubert and Governor Welshman Mahbene, and was endorsed by the late Chief Khayisa Ndiweni, the father of Paramount Chief Nhlanhla Ndiweni. It envisaged a joint venture Ndebele trust created and administered by Chief Khayisa, involving Joubert’s farms, as well as additional trust land.

The approved Hove dam site is on the property and once built, would have great potential for a recreational area with guest cottages on the lake shore, as well as an Ndebele cultural centre and village.

“We also want to attract Ndebele/international historical tourism because the road through the farm was taken by Lobengula, the last king of the Ndebele nation, so the area has immense historical significance, as well as important spiritual sites,” Joubert said.

“This visionary plan requires a government which understands the importance of initiative and will guarantee security of title, which is also critical if international investors are to participate. Beyond positive government rhetoric there is apparently no plan to follow its own laws, let alone encourage development at every level,” said Joubert.

Implications

If the police and the government continue to defy the law and the Zimbabwe constitution, there will be implications regarding government’s re-engagement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the European Union.

With the economy in the grips of a meltdown, kilometre-long fuel queues, devastating power cuts and rapidly rising inflation, President Mnangagwa has said that restoring ties with the West and multilateral lenders, including the IMF, is one of his priorities.

For this priority to be met, which is easily achievable, Joubert said that President Mnangagwa and his government would have to abide by the Zimbabwe Democracy and Economic Recovery Act (ZDERA) which was enacted by the United States in December 2001.

The policy of the US through ZDERA is to support the people of Zimbabwe in their struggle to effect peaceful, democratic change, achieve broad-based and equitable economic growth, and restore the rule of law.

In May this year, Zimbabwe signed up to the IMF’s Staff-Monitored Program, which commits the Mnangagwa government to political and economic reforms as well as fiscal discipline.

During talks held in early June between diplomats and officials in Harare, the EU’s Zimbabwe delegation head, Timo Olkkonen, said they would discuss various issues including economic development, trade, investment, property rights, good governance and adherence to the rule of law.

In blatant disregard for the rule of law, President Mugabe’s government sanctioned, and in many cases aided the seizure of white-owned farms that began in 2000 and still continues. This triggered the collapse of the key agricultural sector, resulting in hyperinflation which peaked at 89.7 sextillion percent in November 2008. (Ref. Prof Steve Hanke, expert in world hyperinflation)

Leading Zimbabwean economist John Robertson warns that the road ahead will be difficult.

“However, if the commitments made by government to bring about the greatly needed changes are sustained, the prospects of removing the instability and uncertainty affecting the country right now should dramatically improve, opening up opportunities for both local and international investment,” he said.

Background to the takeover of Portwe Estate and the Bembesi Conservancy

The invasion of Joubert’s properties took place on July 17, 2007 when he was out of the country and while only his wife, Margaret Joubert and her aged mother were at the farm.

A group of 25 police officers under control of task force commander Assistant Commissioner Edmond Veterai, armed with AK-47 rifles and dressed in riot uniforms, arrived unannounced at the farm. When Mrs Joubert denied them entry, they smashed down the door and stormed into the house.

Under police guard, Mrs Joubert and her mother were only given a few minutes to pack some belongings before being driven away and deposited at a neighbour’s farm.

Joubert’s workers were rounded up and told that the ZRP were the new owners. The officers said that if they wished to work for them, they could return to their houses on the farm.

When all of the workers declined the offer – many of them had worked for Joubert for more than 20 years and had an excellent co-operative relationship with him – they were driven off to distant locations and warned not to return.

The police, who had been brought in from Mashonaland provinces, then confiscated 4 000kg of maize set aside for staff supplies and removed it immediately from the farm. They subsequently  removed hunting rifles, licensed ivory and a brand new generator.

“It also appears that a number of high profile police officers removed building supplies and items of machinery, as well as 22 head of cattle,” Joubert said.

The police officers later went across to Joubert’s neighbours and forced them at gunpoint to hand over their television set, sound system and decoder.

At the time of the police invasion (most invasions involved government-sponsored youths claiming to be war veterans or the youth militia), the farm was running the following programmes:

  • 1 000 ostriches, all for export to European markets
  • 100ha maize for silage for ostrich feed
  • 20ha lucerne for ostrich feed
  • 50ha very high-quality paprika, all for export, mainly to Spain – rotated with maize, potatoes and fodder grasses
  • 3ha vegetables for the local markets of Bulawayo, communal neighbours and neighbouring gold miners.

The entire operation was run with highly-trained black Zimbabwean managers supported by a permanent staff of 60 and between 100-150 women contract workers from the local rural community.

The Bembesi Conservancy

In addition to the highly successful farming operation, Joubert created the Bembesi Conservancy – with government’s assistance. He built it up with the purchase of a wide variety of indigenous species of game and developed an international reputation for high-end hunting safaris.

Joubert’s Bembesi Lodge was built in the 1990s to accommodate the growing popularity of hunting on the estate. It attracted international visitors as well as local and regional holiday-makers during the summer months, also offering outstanding fishing, game viewing and birding opportunities.

The lodge achieved a total occupancy of 1 500 bed-nights annually and recorded an occupancy rate of 95 per cent.

The invasion of the estate resulted in the withdrawal of the large hunting quota and the cancellation of summer lodge bookings after armed members of the ZRP threatened the booking agents at gunpoint and warned them not to take any further bookings.

The police attempted but failed to attract visitors to the lodge themselves and instead used it to entertain high-ranking officers and politicians, as well as for secluded meetings. The severe fire damage to the lounge was caused during a drunken party.

Further damage to property on the farm includes the destruction of, inter alia, three hunting vehicles, an almost new Nissan truck awarded to Joubert’s senior manager as a bonus, and New Holland tractors, as well as the Jouberts’ personal Landcruiser. Attempts to conduct an audit of all property continue to be thwarted by political interference and senior police officers.

The post Massive conservancy development blocked as police officers continue to violate a 2007 court order  appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

Massive conservancy development blocked 

In Zimbabwe, an initiative to set up a massive wildlife conservancy and historical tourism venture that would benefit the local community, as well as contributing to the revival of tourism and the economy by attracting international tourists, is on hold. Source: Massive conservancy development blocked – The Zimbabwean BEFORE: Built in the 1990s, the idyllic […]

The post Massive conservancy development blocked  appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

In Zimbabwe, an initiative to set up a massive wildlife conservancy and historical tourism venture that would benefit the local community, as well as contributing to the revival of tourism and the economy by attracting international tourists, is on hold.

Source: Massive conservancy development blocked – The Zimbabwean

BEFORE: Built in the 1990s, the idyllic thatched stone lodge on Dave Joubert’s Bembesi Conservancy in Zimbabwe was popular with local, regional and international guests due to the outstanding fishing, game viewing and birding opportunities offered from its waterfront site.

The combined farm and safari operation, which is integral to the project and would generate vital foreign currency, continues to be illegally occupied by members of the Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) who took it over by force in July 2007.

Their ongoing occupation is in flagrant disregard of a confirmed court order of September 2007 compelling them to vacate the farm and return it to its lawful owner, Dave Joubert, a high profile Matabeleland farmer of approximately 50 years, and owner of Portwe Estate since 1982.The failure of the government to remove the police from Joubert’s Portwe Estate and Bembesi conservancy demonstrates that Zimbabwe is not “open for business”, as President Mnangagwa claims.

AFTER: The remains of the Bembesi lodge lounge after it caught fire during a drunken party organised by members of the Zimbabwe Republic Police who invaded and took over the productive, privately-owned Portwe farm and Bembesi conservancy in July 2007. Police officers continue to occupy the farm in flagrant disregard of a September 2007 court order stipulating that they vacate the farm with immediate effect.

This visionary project involves Paramount Chief Nhlanhla Felix Ndiweni, whose father, the late Paramount Chief Khayisa Ndiweni, endorsed the initiative, together with the then governor, Welshman Mahbene. Chief Felix Ndiweni has risen rapidly to prominence in Zimbabwe since returning from the UK to take up the hereditary chieftainship.  He was sent to London in 1981 to study for a degree in engineering technology and mechanical engineering, and lived in there for more than 20 years. He also has degrees in management studies, specialising in local governance, and law. He is committed to bringing independence and an end to poverty to his people through individual property rights.

If the police and the Mnangagwa government continue to defy the law and the Zimbabwe constitution, there will be implications regarding the government’s re-engagement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the European Union. With the economy in the grips of a meltdown, kilometre-long fuel queues, devastating power cuts and rapidly rising inflation, President Mnangagwa has said that restoring ties with the West and multilateral lenders, including the IMF, is one of his priorities.

 

The post Massive conservancy development blocked  appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

Botswana legalises elephant hunting and Zimbabwe gets ready to sell them. Internet is divided 

Source: Botswana legalises elephant hunting and Zimbabwe gets ready to sell them. Internet is divided – Trending News News South African country Botswana has legalised elephant hunting and Zimbabwe are ready to sell excess elephants to keep their population in check. Elephants in Botswana, South Africa Ever heard of something like too many elephants? No? […]

The post Botswana legalises elephant hunting and Zimbabwe gets ready to sell them. Internet is divided  appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

Source: Botswana legalises elephant hunting and Zimbabwe gets ready to sell them. Internet is divided – Trending News News

South African country Botswana has legalised elephant hunting and Zimbabwe are ready to sell excess elephants to keep their population in check.

Elephants in Botswana, South Africa Photo: Reuters

Elephants in Botswana, South Africa

Ever heard of something like too many elephants? No? People of Botswana and Zimbabwe know exactly what we are talking about. The two countries of South Africa don’t just share a border, they also share the same problem. Too many elephants.

Yes, that is correct.

Botswana houses over 1,35,000 elephants. These elephants who roam freely on the lands of the country now are unaware that their future might be in danger.

The Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources Conservation and Tourism released an official statement in which they said, “Government of Botswana has taken a decision to lift the hunting suspension.”

Dead elephant

The reasons that they gave for this harsh decision were, “1) The number and high levels of human-elephant conflict and the consequent impact on livelihoods was increasing.
2) Predators appear to have increased and were causing a lot of damage as they kill livestock in large numbers.
3) There is a negative impact of the hunting suspension on livelihoods, particularly for community-based organisations that were previously benefiting from consumptive utilisation.
4) The lack of capacity within the Department of Wildlife and National Parks leads to long response time to problem animal control reports.
5) The general consensus from those consulted was that the hunting ban should be lifted.”

They have also uplifted the shoot-to-kill policy.

However, Zimbabwe is taking a lesser cruel path. Zimbabwe is sending their elephants to other countries. According to reports by Bloomberg, Zimbabwe plans to sell their elephants to Angola and is ready to ship them to anyone who wants to buy.

This is not the first time, Zimbabwe has previously made approximately 2.7 million dollars by selling elephants to China and the United Arab Emirates.

These decisions have divided the internet into two polar opposite groups. One group that is absolutely against the decision and the other one that comprises of the people who stay in these countries and are totally pro the steps being taken.

Even the famous Ellen tweeted about the same.

Ellen DeGeneres

✔@TheEllenShow

President Masisi, for every person who wants to kill elephants, there are millions who want them protected. We’re watching. @OfficialMasisi https://twitter.com/yashar/status/1131267639765086208 

Yashar Ali 🐘

✔@yashar

Replying to @yashar

4. BREAKING: Botswana is lifting the ban on elephant hunting.

Many believe this is an attempt by President Masisi to curry favor with rural voters ahead of the elections later this year.

Elephants are being used as a political tool. #ProtectElephants

View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter
5,494 people are talking about this

People who are against the hunting

Cynthia Goedhart@CynthiaGoedhart

I get it. People in Botswana are not safe anymore. But why not raise money worldwide and replace elephants to other countries/ areas where there is space. Maybe a stupid thought but there MUST be other solutions than killing them… 🙏😔

39 people are talking about this

There are a lot of people who are also supporting these decisions.

Sonny Serite@kuvuki

You conclude by making a veiled threat “we are watching”. Perhaps you need to come to Botswana and watch live how the the elephants are overly populated and causing havoc here

24 people are talking about this

Sonny Serite@kuvuki

Dear Ellen, for every human being killed by an elephant (they are over populated here), there are millions who want them protected. We love our people, we love our elephants and we know how to take care of both. Spare us your ignorance

55 people are talking about this

Ross Allen@rossallen3

Hunting pays for anti-poaching efforts in the region. Botswana has made a principled decision that hunting is conservation and balances community needs with wildlife management.

111 people are talking about this

The post Botswana legalises elephant hunting and Zimbabwe gets ready to sell them. Internet is divided  appeared first on Zimbabwe Situation.

RICH RAMAPHOSA WILL NEVER LOOT : UNIONIST

President Cyril Ramaphosa will never loot public funds
because he is rich.

This was said by National Education‚ Health and Allied
Workers’ Union (Nehawu) general-secretary Zola Saphetha‚ who was speaking to
the media on the sidelines of the union’…

President Cyril Ramaphosa will never loot public funds because he is rich. This was said by National Education‚ Health and Allied Workers' Union (Nehawu) general-secretary Zola Saphetha‚ who was speaking to the media on the sidelines of the union's policy conference in Boksburg on Friday. Saphetha was weighing in on the union's relationship with President Ramaphosa‚ Nehawu having been the

NO WARRIORS BOYCOTT : ZIFA

ZIMBABWE will not be withdrawing from the Total Africa Cup
of Nations tournament that is ongoing here in Egypt, head of delegation Farai
Jere has confirmed.

While confirming that there were issues over allowances for
the players, Jere said there w…

ZIMBABWE will not be withdrawing from the Total Africa Cup of Nations tournament that is ongoing here in Egypt, head of delegation Farai Jere has confirmed. While confirming that there were issues over allowances for the players, Jere said there was never a hint of withdrawing from the tournament. “I can confirm that we held a meeting with the players over allowances which the boys are

HUGE blow for Zimbabweans as Mnangagwa introduces TOUGH new law on maize sales and transportation

All maize to be sold to GMB, as govt bans private sales; two years in prison for offenders Zimbabwe published new regulations on Friday requiring all maize to be sold to the Grain Marketing Board (GMB), in a move designed to control prices of the stapl…

All maize to be sold to GMB, as govt bans private sales; two years in prison for offenders Zimbabwe published new regulations on Friday requiring all maize to be sold to the Grain Marketing Board (GMB), in a move designed to control prices of the staple mealie-meal. The regulations, published under Statutory Instrument 145 of […]

19 PERISH IN HORROR CRASH

Nineteen people died this morning in a road traffic head on
collision involving a Toyota commuter omnibus and a haulage truck along the
Harare-Beitbridge Road. 

The accident occurred at the 89km peg at Ngezi Bridge in
Featherstone around 9.45am.

Nineteen people died this morning in a road traffic head on collision involving a Toyota commuter omnibus and a haulage truck along the Harare-Beitbridge Road.  The accident occurred at the 89km peg at Ngezi Bridge in Featherstone around 9.45am.  National police spokesperson Assistant Commissioner Paul Nyathi confirmed the accident and said they were still carrying out investigations. “

‘Walter Magaya must be thoroughly investigated, he must not be allowed to continue abusing women’

Political activist and academic, Patson Dzamara has called for an investigation into the conduct of charismatic preacher, Walter Magaya over allegations of rape. Magaya is the founder and leader of a Harare-based megachurch, Prophetic Healing and Deliv…

Political activist and academic, Patson Dzamara has called for an investigation into the conduct of charismatic preacher, Walter Magaya over allegations of rape. Magaya is the founder and leader of a Harare-based megachurch, Prophetic Healing and Deliverance Ministries (PHD). Said Dzamara through his Twitter account: “Makandiwa leads a big congregation just like Magaya but I’ve […]