Turmoil as sexy dancer Bev Sibanda gets bashed after beating a fan who had fondled her buttocks

Raunchy dancer Beverly ‘Bev’ Sibanda was on Friday bashed after slapping a fan who had fondled her buttocks. The dancer who is on nationwide tour was on stage at PaGomo Bar in Kariba when she was fondled. Bev reportedly warned the fan who then responde…

Raunchy dancer Beverly 'Bev' Sibanda was on Friday bashed after slapping a fan who had fondled her buttocks. The dancer who is on nationwide tour was on stage at PaGomo Bar in Kariba when she was fondled. Bev reportedly warned the fan who then responded with vulgar words a scenario which didn't go well with […]

Dam levels decline

Source: Dam levels decline | The Herald April 22, 2019 Elita Chikwati Senior Reporter The national dam level average now stands at 69,3 percent as water levels continue to decline due to little or no inflows and an upsurge in withdrawals, the Zimbabwe National Water Authority has said. Zinwa latest dam levels statistics show that […]

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Source: Dam levels decline | The Herald April 22, 2019

Dam levels decline

Elita Chikwati Senior Reporter
The national dam level average now stands at 69,3 percent as water levels continue to decline due to little or no inflows and an upsurge in withdrawals, the Zimbabwe National Water Authority has said.

Zinwa latest dam levels statistics show that as at April 12, the national dam level average was 69,3 percent marking a 0,9 percent decline from the previous week.

Zinwa corporate communications and marketing manager, Mrs Marjorie Munyonga said Gwayi Catchment has a dam level average of 65,6 percent, Manyame 90 percent, Mazowe 94,8 percent Mzingwane 67,1 percent, Runde 58,8 percent, Sanyati 74,7 percent and Save 82,4 percent.

She said the commencement of the winter cropping season is set to increase pressure on the dams.

“Zinwa appeals to all farmers who will be involved in winter cropping to ensure that they have the relevant water abstraction agreements for them to have irrigation water reserved for them in the dams.

“No water shall be reserved in the dams for unregistered users while Zinwa shall also intensify its monitoring activities along river channels to ensure that all illegal water use is eliminated,” she said.

In Manyame catchment, Chivero Dam which is for irrigation and water supply is 84,3 percent full while Mazvikadei Dam is 92,4 percent full.

Under Mazowe catchment, Mazowe Dam used for irrigation is 83,9 percent full, while Rufaro which is for water supply and irrigation is 100,8 percent full. In Mzingwane, Mtshabezi Dam which is for irrigation and water supply is 86,4 percent full. Upper Ncema for water supply is 12,4 percent and Insiza which is for irrigation and water supply is 60,2 percent.

Under Runde Catchment, the dams for irrigation are Tugwi Mukosi which is 57,3 percent full, Manjirenji (82,3 percent) and Mutirikwi (51, 9 percent) while Wenimbi and Osborne dams both in the Save Catchment are 82,1 percent and 70, 5 percent full respectively.

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BREAKING: 11 people feared dead in Kombi-Honda Fit accident

11 people feared dead after a commuter omnibus coming from Mutare was involved in an accident with a Honda Fit in Headlands early this morning. This is a developing story and it shall be updated as soon as more details emerge. More details to follow &#…

11 people feared dead after a commuter omnibus coming from Mutare was involved in an accident with a Honda Fit in Headlands early this morning. This is a developing story and it shall be updated as soon as more details emerge. More details to follow … — ZBC

Zimbabwe mining firms want ownership restrictions scrapped

Source: Zimbabwe mining firms want ownership restrictions scrapped | Fin24 Zimbabwe’s Chamber of Mines, which represents most of the mining companies active in the country, wants ownership restrictions on platinum group metals and diamond operations officially scrapped, the group’s president, Batirai Manhando, said. The government has said it plans to do away with restrictions that […]

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Source: Zimbabwe mining firms want ownership restrictions scrapped | Fin24

Zimbabwe’s Chamber of Mines, which represents most of the mining companies active in the country, wants ownership restrictions on platinum group metals and diamond operations officially scrapped, the group’s president, Batirai Manhando, said.

The government has said it plans to do away with restrictions that stipulate that the mines must be 51% owned by black Zimbabweans, but is yet to change the legislation.

“The indigenisation regulations have been scrapped except for platinum and diamonds, we would also want this law scrapped officially so we can get industry players coming in,” Manhando said at a conference in Johannesburg on Wednesday. “These are areas that require huge capital and if you put restrictions I don’t think you would be able to attract a lot of capital.”

Senior government officials have repeatedly said that the ownership laws, put in place during the presidency of Robert Mugabe, will be scrapped to help attract investment to an economy decimated by years of misrule. Mining is the country’s biggest source of foreign exchange.

While the nation’s finance minister Mthuli Ncube has previously said the local ownership law would be scrapped for all minerals, government will, for now, insist that local investors retain control in diamond mining even as it seeks to lure mining giants such as Russian giant Alrosa PJSC, Polite Kambamura, deputy mines minister, said in an interview.

Potential discoveries of gems in the southern Masvingo province means government needs time to gauge the potential of the industry, he added.

“It has to be put down in legislation and the government is finalising that,” he said at the conference. “It will happen very soon.”

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Facing the truth – Zimbabwe Vigil Diary

Source: Facing the truth – Zimbabwe Vigil Diary: 20th April 2019 Elements of corruption’ is a gross understatement but it was nevertheless a welcome breath of reality from President Mnangagwa in his ZBC television interview on the eve of Independence Day. Mnangagwa came to power promising to root out corruption but now says he didn’t […]

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Source: Facing the truth – Zimbabwe Vigil Diary: 20th April 2019

Elements of corruption’ is a gross understatement but it was nevertheless a welcome breath of reality from President Mnangagwa in his ZBC television interview on the eve of Independence Day.

Mnangagwa came to power promising to root out corruption but now says he didn’t realize the extent of the problem until he tookc office and admitted that he had not been able to fulfil his promise.

‘Corruption is deep rooted. I thought by making a pronouncement that ‘let us fight corruption’ it will go away. No. It’s not like that. To fight corruption, you need the police to investigate but there are elements of corruption in the police. Once you get past the corruption in the police, the National Prosecution Authority has to prosecute, but there are also elements of corruption in the NPA. Then the case must go to court and there are also elements that are corrupt in the judiciary. So the fight is so wide and deep,’ he said (see: https://www.timeslive.co.za/news/africa/2019-04-18-zimbabwe-corruption-runs-deep-and-wide-mnangagwa/).

Mnangagwa added that there were some individuals in the judiciary and police who were doing their best to nip the problem in the bud. But the Vigil believes the bud is Zanu PF itself. 

Mnangagwa talks of ‘corrupt elements’ but he seized power nearly a year and a half ago and can’t now shrug his shoulders and say things are out of his control. The truth is that  he leads what Dr Pedzisai Ruhanya of Crisis in Zimbabwe Coalition describes as a ‘predatory, corrupt, parasitic, authoritarian and militarised elite that has privatised the struggle for personal greed’ (see: https://zwnews.com/gloomy-independence-for-zimas-hyperinflation-returns/).

The message of Easter is to face the truth. Until those in charge face this challenge the future of Zimbabwe will be bleak.

Other points

  • The Vigil is presenting a petition to the Prime Minister’s residence at 10 Downing Street next Saturday at 3.30 pm. The petition urges the UK government not to support Zimbabwe’s readmission to the Commonwealth until it reforms and acknowledges the genocide of some 20,000 Ndebeles in the 1980s. Thanks to Esther Munyira for organising police permission for this.
  • A special thank you to Vigil Co-ordinator Patricia Masamba for managing the last three Vigils on her own in the absence of the other co-ordinators.
  • Thanks to those who came early to help set up the front table and put up the banners: Patricia, Miriam Gasho, Nyarai Masvosva and Mary Muteyerwa. Thanks to Patricia and Nyarai for looking after the front table, to Miriam for handing out flyers, to Mary for drumming and to Patricia for photos
  • For latest Vigil pictures check: http://www.flickr.com/photos/zimbabwevigil/. Please note: Vigil photos can only be downloaded from our Flickr website.

FOR THE RECORD: 7 signed the register. A small attendance today because of the MDC UK and Ireland national conference in Leeds.

EVENTS AND NOTICES:

  • Zimbabwe Vigil petition presentation to 10 Downing Street. Saturday 27th April at 3.30 pm.
  • ROHR fundraising dinner. Saturday 27th April from 6 – 11.30 pm. Venue: Zazas, 108 Whitechapel Road, London E1 1JE. Contact: Esther Munyira 07492058109, Fungisai Mupandira 07468504393, Casper Nyamakura 0757766912, Margaret Munenge 0739211743, Bianca Mpawaenda 07400566013 and Patricia Masamba 07708116625.
  • ROHR Reading branch general meeting and outreach. Saturday 27th April. General meeting from 11:30 am – 1:30 pm. Venue: Royal Festival hall, Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX. Outreach from 2 – 5 pm at the Vigil. Contact: Joshua Kahari (branch information and publicity) 07877246251, Nicodimus Muganhu (branch chairperson) 07877386792, Alice Shimika (branch secretary) 07462067504
  • The Restoration of Human Rights in Zimbabwe (ROHR) is the Vigil’s partner organization based in Zimbabwe. ROHR grew out of the need for the Vigil to have an organization on the ground in Zimbabwe which reflected the Vigil’s mission statement in a practical way. ROHR in the UK actively fundraises through membership subscriptions, events, sales etc to support the activities of ROHR in Zimbabwe. Please note that the official website of ROHR Zimbabwe is http://www.rohrzimbabwe.org/. Any other website claiming to be the official website of ROHR in no way represents us.
  • The Vigil’s book ‘Zimbabwe Emergency’ is based on our weekly diaries. It records how events in Zimbabwe have unfolded as seen by the diaspora in the UK. It chronicles the economic disintegration, violence, growing oppression and political manoeuvring – and the tragic human cost involved. It is available at the Vigil for £10. All proceeds go to the Vigil and our sister organisation the Restoration of Human Rights in Zimbabwe’s work in Zimbabwe. The book is also available from Amazon.
  • Facebook pages:

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Editorial Comment: President needs our support in war on graft

Source: Editorial Comment: President needs our support in war on graft | Herald (Top Stories) Corruption in its widest sense is a cancer eating into Zimbabwe and President Mnangagwa’s frustration over the difficulty of cutting it away from the public and private sectors and then keeping it away was evident last week. We have resources: […]

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Source: Editorial Comment: President needs our support in war on graft | Herald (Top Stories)

Corruption in its widest sense is a cancer eating into Zimbabwe and President Mnangagwa’s frustration over the difficulty of cutting it away from the public and private sectors and then keeping it away was evident last week.

We have resources: the police have a duty to investigate crime and gather evidence; the National Prosecuting Authority has a duty to bring to court those under suspicion once enough evidence is gathered; the Judiciary has the duty to rule whether a law has in fact been broken and if so whether there is adequate evidence to prove beyond reasonable doubt that the suspect is guilty.

Backing up the law enforcement there is the Anti-Corruption Commission, now in the process of being reformed. Following the inauguration of President Mnangagwa the battle against corruption was upgraded from something that people talked about to something that there were supposed to take action to eliminate.

There were prominent arrests, bail was granted but then nothing more than regular further remands and a couple of successful defence applications to have charges withdrawn.

The President has pushed hard. Unlike past practice he has not been prepared to have those under investigation or suspicion sitting in the same Cabinet room as himself and has taken action to reform processes and procedures, but as he notes there is a lot more to do and the whole process is going far more slowly than it should.

Corruption is not just payment of bribes. In fact most of the cases that have come before the courts do not involve that particular criminal behaviour, which is incredibly difficult to prove because people do not hand over bundles of cash in front of witnesses and in broad daylight.

Rather we see those with the power to make decisions, or can influence others to make decisions, use that power to bend or break rules and award contracts and the like to either themselves, through their indirect ownership of some company, or to their friends and relations.

Then there is the crony capitalism problem, identified as a serious problem in India and one reason why India’s economic growth is slower than China’s, despite more apparent advantages. This is where people convert friendship into wealth, doing little favours for each other, favours that might just be passing on information.

It is not just in the public sector that this happens. The private sector has its fair share of corruption elements, but the private sector has also developed a number of defences. Small companies are often family affairs because people feel they can trust their own kin. Large companies put in a plethora of systems.

There are strong rules, with some decisions requiring committee decisions so minimising the power of a single person to award a contract. There are two sets of auditors, the internal auditors on the payroll and the external auditors. Boards of directors usually have both insiders, the executive directors and sometimes major shareholders who are not in executive positions, and independent non-executive directors with one of these normally chairing an audit committee, looking at reports from both sets of auditors.

And things come to light. As the President has found it is often difficult to prove anything, but at least action can be taken. Everyone has noted sudden resignations, sudden early retirements. Sometimes there is even a civil suit, but not as often as there should be, but at least the problem person is sent away. But it does not always work. Sometimes the corrupt activity encompasses so many that no one squeals and everyone covers up.

The public sector has basically the same checks. The Auditor-General has extensive legal powers. Instead of an audit committee of the board of directors there is the powerful Public Accounts Committee in Parliament, always chaired by a backbencher not in Government and sometimes, as at present, by an opposition MP.

Procurement, one of the trickier areas to police, is done by strict rules operated by a committee, preferably of people of different backgrounds to make it harder to get trust for illegalities. But party politics sometimes intrude, with people wanting to score points rather than hunt down the guilty or even cover up for their friends, who might be on the other side of the Parliamentary aisle.

We need to remember that people do not deal with others in just a working, official or business environment. They meet at church, play golf together, they sit next to each other at school sports days, they meet at parties and socials. This can make the world go around, oiling the works for good, and for evil. We cannot stop socialising, but we can ensure that we have enforced rules that make converting that friendship into immoral wealth is prevented.

We need a major change in attitude. Too often people say to themselves that “everyone is doing it”, so they wonder why they should not. The answer, as always, is because we are all responsible for our actions and we should have enough self-worth and self-respect not to break laws. In the end such people are admired.

And somehow such people need to be brought into the battle against those who are lesser, if richer, humans. Countries that have won major battles against corruption have found men and women ready to take on the corrupt. Sometimes they are called fanatics; sometimes, as happened in Italy when major inroads were made against Mafia-corruption, they are murdered. But without teams of competent investigators led by people with very clean hands prepared to excuse nothing, we cannot win.

The President cannot fight corruption alone. He needs the support of all decent people who want it to end, regardless of who is involved and what friendships might end as a result. More and more people need to want to live a clean life themselves, and more and more need to be ready to speak out when they see wrong.

This sort of thing should be outside the political arena; it is simply setting the basic conditions for a successful Zimbabwe. The politicians can then argue on how to move forward on other policies. But surely committing and hiding crime is not on anyone’s agenda.

.

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Unity, sacrifice key to recovery: ED

Source: Unity, sacrifice key to recovery: ED | The Herald April 22, 2019 President Mnangagwa Daniel Nemukuyu Senior Reporter PRESIDENT Mnangagwa has urged Zimbabweans to unite and collectively work hard to overcome challenges facing the nation. In an Easter Holiday message to the nation, the President said unity, sacrifice and hard work were key to […]

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Source: Unity, sacrifice key to recovery: ED | The Herald April 22, 2019

Unity, sacrifice key to recovery: EDPresident Mnangagwa

Daniel Nemukuyu Senior Reporter
PRESIDENT Mnangagwa has urged Zimbabweans to unite and collectively work hard to overcome challenges facing the nation. In an Easter Holiday message to the nation, the President said unity, sacrifice and hard work were key to the country’s economic recovery.

He said victory was certain and the nation should draw inspiration from the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The President said Zimbabwe will triumph the same way Christ conquered death.

“As we celebrate Easter, we commemorate our Lord Jesus Christ’s resurrection. The struggle and victory of light over darkness, of life over death.

“In Zimbabwe, we are currently undergoing our own struggle of light over darkness. As we walk the road of transformation and reform, we are guided by our Lord Jesus Christ’s teachings of forgiveness, peace and love, and take comfort from his victory.

“For while the challenges we face are significant, we are resolute in our faith that with hard work, sacrifice and unity, we too will triumph,” said President Mnangagwa. The President wished Zimbabweans a blessed Easter.

“On behalf of the Government of Zimbabwe and the First Family, I would like to wish all Zimbabweans at home and abroad a blessed Easter. May the Almighty protect and bless our land,” he said.

President Mnangagwa has since opened the avenue for dialogue with other political parties in Zimbabwe to ensure that they also have an input in the country’s governance discourse.

So far a number of meetings involving political parties that participated in the July 30, 2018 general elections have been held.

Speaking at a recent inaugural session of the Zimbabwe-Botswana Bi-National Commission in Harare President Mnangagwa said his Government was pushing for national, peace, unity and harmony.

“My administration continues to push for greater national peace, unity and harmony and cohesion,” said President Mnangagwa.

“Fully aware that a nation at peace with itself is a nation that can achieve socio economic development.”

As such, the President said, the national dialogue platform will allow a broader cross section of the political players to express their views and input into the governance discourse of this country.

He said the Government was also committed to dialogue at across the entire region and beyond.

Government has also adopted the Transitional Stabilisation Programme (TSP), an economic blueprint which is expected to transform Zimbabwe into a upper middle income society by 2030.

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‘Gukurahundi inquiry reports lost’

Source: ‘Gukurahundi inquiry reports lost’ | Newsday (News) REPORTS of two government commissions of inquiry into post-independence massacres in Matabeleland and parts of Midlands “have been lost”, National Peace and Reconciliation Commission (NPRC) chairperson Justice Selo Nare has claimed. Nare, whose commission will shortly carry out public hearings into the 1980s massacres and propose a […]

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Source: ‘Gukurahundi inquiry reports lost’ | Newsday (News)

REPORTS of two government commissions of inquiry into post-independence massacres in Matabeleland and parts of Midlands “have been lost”, National Peace and Reconciliation Commission (NPRC) chairperson Justice Selo Nare has claimed.

Nare, whose commission will shortly carry out public hearings into the 1980s massacres and propose a way forward, says they asked the government for the reports of the Dumbutshena Commission of Inquiry which investigated the events surrounding the Entumbane uprising between November 1980 and March 1981 and the commission of inquiry into the Matabeleland disturbances also known as the Chihambakwe Commission of Inquiry which investigated the killing of civilians by the Fifth Brigade between 1983 and 1985.

“It’s unfortunate though that the previous commissions’ reports have been lost. Nonetheless, the government is still looking for the whereabouts of the
Dumbutshena and Chihambakwe reports,” Nare was quoted as saying by the Centre for Innovation and Technology.

He was speaking on the sidelines of the 39th Independence celebrations at Phelandaba Stadium in Gwanda.

But, the NPRC, in a statement, denied reports that the two reports had gone missing, suggesting Nare could have made the claims in his own personal capacity or
been misquoted by the media.

“The issue of the Chihambakwe and Dumbutshena reports was never discussed by the full commission. It could be that Retired Justice Nare was either misquoted or was speaking in his personal capacity and not on behalf of the NPRC institution, if indeed he said it,” NPRC said in a statement.

In 2000, two human rights groups, the Legal Resources Foundation (LRF) and the Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights (ZLHR), filed an application in the Supreme Court, seeking an order compelling then President Robert Mugabe to publicise the two reports.

But then Justice minister Emmerson Mnangagwa, in affidavits filed with the court on behalf of Mugabe, said the Dumbutshena report could no longer be located.
Mnangagwa, now the President, was State Security minister during the massacres with independent reports by rights groups indicating that 20 000 were killed
during the disturbances. The President recently invited a public debate on Gukurahundi (a Shona word which means the rains that wash away the chaff).

Survivors and rights groups say any genuine discussions around Gukurahundi should begin with the government making public the two reports, which have been kept under lock and key.

The Dumbutshena Commission, chaired by the now late former Chief Justice Enoch Dumbutshena, presented its findings to then Prime Minister Robert Mugabe in 1981.

The commission looked into sporadic violence that broke out starting in April 1980 when Mugabe’s Zanu PF won 57 parliamentary seats out of 100 in the first democratic elections after the war. The violence was reported in the vicinity of guerrilla assembly points all over the country.

In November that year, there was a battle between Zipra and Zanla guerrillas, who had been moved from rural assembly points to Entumbane in Bulawayo. There was a second more violent outbreak of clashes in February 1981 at Entumbane which spilled over to Ntabazinduna and Connemara in the Midlands. More than 300 guerrillas, mostly former Zipra, were killed after Mugabe’s government sent in air support.

The Chihambakwe Commission, chaired by the former Supreme Court judge Simplisius Chihambakwe, was set up in September 1983 to investigate atrocities by the Fifth Brigade which was deployed in Matabeleland, starting in December 1982 with orders to “combat dissidents”, reference to a few dozen former Zipra fighters who refused to put down arms after rejecting Mugabe’s rule.

The commission began its work in January 1984. It was made up of Justice Chihambakwe, two lawyers John Ngara and Prince Machaya (Zimbabwe’s current Attorney-General) and the commander of 1 Brigade Mike Shute.

In November 1985, the government, through Mnangagwa, announced that the Chihambakwe Commission’s report would not be made public, which was read by some as confirmation that it was damning on the government.

Not many people are hopeful Nare’s commission will get anywhere with its much-hyped Gukurahundi re-examination, pointing to the fact that Mnangagwa and some generals who may be linked to the killings would not want to expose their dark past.

“As a leader of the commission, my wish is to see justice prevailing and to amicably solve this problem that is dividing the nation,” Nare maintained. “We shall be soon carrying out public hearings with the affected people where reconciliation will be the main agenda, as well as taking people’s views on the way forward. President Mnangagwa has opened the doors for free dialogue without fear.”

He said the public hearings will begin during the first week of May in Kezi before moving to Gwanda, Tsholotsho, Lupane and Nkayi. In order to cover ground, the commission will be split into two groups, one responsible for Matabeleland region, while the other will deal with Midlands province.

Nare said his commission will be supporting exhumations and reburials of victims, with the first they have facilitated so far set to take place on May 27 in Sipepa, Tsholotsho.

“There’s a mass grave near the railway line. It has come to our attention that when it rains, some human bones are exposed. We are, therefore, inviting and hoping that relatives of the victims will come in their numbers to identify the remains through DNA testing,” he said.

Zimlive

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Anti-graft fight on: President’s man

Source: Anti-graft fight on: President’s man | The Herald April 22, 2019 Mr Tabani Mpofu Tichaona Zindoga Acting Editor The national anti-corruption fight is game on. That is the strong feeling of the director and chairman of the Special Anti-Corruption Unit in the President’s Office (Sacu) Mr Tabani Mpofu. Over the past months — close […]

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Source: Anti-graft fight on: President’s man | The Herald April 22, 2019

Anti-graft fight on: President’s man
Mr Tabani Mpofu

Tichaona Zindoga Acting Editor
The national anti-corruption fight is game on. That is the strong feeling of the director and chairman of the Special Anti-Corruption Unit in the President’s Office (Sacu) Mr Tabani Mpofu. Over the past months — close to 24, in fact — there has been a lot of high-profile cases that have been prosecuted against corruption, but the conviction rate has been low. Quite miserably.

In his interview with the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC) ahead of Independence Day last week, President Mnangagwa said the anti-corruption crusade — one of his key reckoning points — was beset by corruption as the system designed to deal with the scourge, from arrests to the courts, was compromised.

The Head of State and Government said he would have to be a little more patient.

And in an exclusive interview with The Herald yesterday, Mr Mpofu admitted that the fight was complicated, but sounded optimistic that the cancer would be defeated.

Mr Mpofu also spoke about the capacity of the prosecution authority,   the legality of Sacu; how Sacu related to the Prosecutor-General’s Office and how Sacu would have the final word on corruption.

There is also the uncomfortable question of whether there is bad blood between the prosecution and Judiciary, with recent reports of judges and magistrates sounding off scathing opinions about the nature and quality of prosecutions.

All these questions have led to the well-placed skepticism about the current fight against graft.

“The President was 100 percent correct in saying that corruption is deep-rooted in all our spheres of activity. It is not just Government, but beyond as well. But coming back to what the President has said, in our experience, we have seen that those that are corrupt are represented in every step of the justice system and that getting matters even to commence as trial is a matter that involves many corruption hurdles. Yes, the President was correct that fighting corruption is not a matter that can be swatted away easily.”

He explained that in the Second Republic, unlike in the previous era where there were no arrests, there had been a new focus in the arrest and prosecution of high-profile figures, bettering the record of arrests without or with delayed trials.

However, since 2017 the so-called high-profile figures began to be arrested and caused to appear in the courts, with the appointment of the Special Anti-Corruption Unit in June last year.

“Our immediate task was to ensure that those pending matters — that had been pending for seven or eight months would be allocated trial dates,” he said.

That included the case of businessman Mr Wicknell Chivayo, he said. Mr Chivayo was recently cleared of fraud over a solar tender he entered with the Zimbabwe Power Company (ZPC).

In the Chivayo case, and in others, Mr Mpofu said the defence made applications that were meant to curtail and delay the cases.

Mr Mpofu said his unit worked with the Prosecutor-General’s Office, and was equally equipped with expertise, challenging widely-held notions that the anti-corruption crusade lacked skills.

“Let me correct misconceptions that are in the public domain. We prosecute under the authority of the PG and it is his sole authority that we are able to prosecute in court. Now, in terms of capacity, we do not act in isolation . . . we operate under the PG office and I will state it now that the PG’s office, and us, combined have the capacity to handle any case of any nature that is brought and can be and will be brought before our courts; so this is not an issue of capacity.”

He decried that, as “persons of means” corruption-accused persons were taking a number of steps to stop their prosecutions — provided in the Constitution — including using exceptions, making the cases some kind of football match. He said, the State would not circumvent the processes.

“In terms of there been no convictions — as you have correctly observed — it is because we are undergoing processes that cannot be circumvented and going through trials.”

Yet, he said, the “majority” of cases that the unit is currently seized with are now ready for trials.

“We are happy with the progress we have made in that the majority, the vast majority of the cases that we have dealt with, have actually reached a stage the that we, the State, are ready to commence prosecuting them and we have approached the courts for their trials.

“With time, we will complete them and we will get convictions, I’m sure.”

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Mnangagwa won’t take the country anywhere: Busha

Source: Mnangagwa won’t take the country anywhere: Busha – NewsDay Zimbabwe April 22, 2019 BY KENNETH NYANGANI OPPOSITION Freezim Congress leader Joseph Busha has challenged President Emmerson Mnangagwa to prove to the nation that he has the capacity to resolve the rising economic challenges facing the country. Busha told NewsDay in Mutare on Friday after […]

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Source: Mnangagwa won’t take the country anywhere: Busha – NewsDay Zimbabwe April 22, 2019

BY KENNETH NYANGANI

OPPOSITION Freezim Congress leader Joseph Busha has challenged President Emmerson Mnangagwa to prove to the nation that he has the capacity to resolve the rising economic challenges facing the country.

Busha told NewsDay in Mutare on Friday after visiting Clyclone Idai victims in Chimanimani where he donated groceries worth thousands of dollars, that he doubted Mnangagwa’s pedigree.

“I want Emmerson Mnangagwa to prove that he is leading the best government, they should show why they are the best; they should show to us how many jobs they have created; they should show us by building hospitals and clinics; and they should show by helping improve the living conditions of the Zimbabweans,” Busha said.

“My view at the moment is that this government is not different from the old of Robert Mugabe. I believe that nothing is going to change in terms of economy, as long as we have this Zanu PF leading our country.”

Busha added: “There is no political will to solve the current crisis facing the country; investors and people do not trust this government.”

The opposition leader recently described the national dialogue initiated by Mnangagwa as a useless exercise which would not take the country forward.

Mnangagwa recently invited the 2018 losing presidential aspirants for talks to share ideas on how to move the nation out of the doldrums.

Although the majority of the losing candidates responded to Mnangagwa’s call, others including MDC leader Nelson Chamisa boycotted the process.

Busha said he was helping the people of Chimanimani on humanitarian grounds.

“We are not here to campaign, but I want to thank you for voting in the presidential election that was held last year in which I was also in the race,” Busha
said

“I should not wait until I get into power to give to people who are in need. What if I die today or tomorrow? I want to help people and I should do the best I can when I am still alive. This is also a way to thank God for giving me what I have. For me, this is humanity and that’s God-fearing. I want men and women who can be servants to the people and also God-fearing.”

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